China, Japan Blast the Competition in Gaming IPOs

Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg

King Digital Entertainment Plc's most popular game is “Candy Crush Saga,” which made up 78 percent of cash spent by players at King last year. Demand for the puzzle game, which features different colored candies, drove an elevenfold surge in revenue in 2013 to $1.9 billion. Close

King Digital Entertainment Plc's most popular game is “Candy Crush Saga,” which made up... Read More

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Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg

King Digital Entertainment Plc's most popular game is “Candy Crush Saga,” which made up 78 percent of cash spent by players at King last year. Demand for the puzzle game, which features different colored candies, drove an elevenfold surge in revenue in 2013 to $1.9 billion.

If there was a game called "IPO-Ville," Zynga wouldn't have the biggest cash crops.

While the maker of "FarmVille" raised the most money among gaming companies that have gone public in the U.S., if you look beyond America's borders, it's the Asian companies with the top scores in initial public offerings.

With "Candy Crush Saga" creator King Digital Entertainment raising $500 million in its public offering, Bloomberg Rankings looked at the biggest gaming IPOs worldwide. Among the top 10, Asian companies make up seven of them. China accounts for the most, which isn't surprising given that there were 338 million players of online games in that country last year, according to a government agency report. That's bigger than the population of the U.S.

Here are the top 10 video game IPOs, based on the amount of money raised. We also included where the company is based and whether the stock is still active (if you recall the U.S. ranking, only 4 of the top 10, including King, were still trading).

1. Nexon ($1.17 billion, Japan, active)

2. Shanda Games ($1.04 billion, China, active)

3. Giant Interactive ($1.02 billion, China, active)

4. Zynga ($1 billion, U.S., active)

5. King Digital ($500 million, Ireland, to begin trading)

6. Playtech ($461 million, Isle of Man, active)

7. Square ($281 million, Japan, acquired)

8. Forgame ($237 million, China, active)

9. Atlus ($218 million, Japan, acquired)

10. Perfect World ($217 million, China, active)

Methodology: Bloomberg ranked video-game company initial public offerings based on their value in U.S. dollars. Included were entertainment software or home-entertainment software companies in the communications or technology sectors.

As of: March 25, 2014

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