Capital Gains Rose 60% in Year Before U.S. Tax Increase

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

The Internal Revenue Service, which already collects income data for tax purposes, is responsible for sending the subsidies directly to health insurers during 2014. Close

The Internal Revenue Service, which already collects income data for tax purposes, is... Read More

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Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

The Internal Revenue Service, which already collects income data for tax purposes, is responsible for sending the subsidies directly to health insurers during 2014.

U.S. taxpayers claimed 60.4 percent more in capital gains in 2012 than 2011, locking in lower tax rates before the 2013 tax increase took effect, according to Internal Revenue Service data released today.

Qualified dividend payments rose 50.9 percent, according to the preliminary data.

During 2012, long-term capital gains and qualified dividends were subject to a top rate of 15 percent. Starting in 2013, the top rate was 23.8 percent, because of the expiration of some of President George W. Bush’s tax cuts and an investment tax in President Barack Obama’s 2010 health care law.

Taxpayers’ actions mirror what happened at the end of 1986, before a capital gains tax rate increase scheduled to take effect in 1987, said Alan Auerbach, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley.

“Capital gains realizations are extremely sensitive to the timing of tax rate changes,” he said. “I don’t think anybody disputes that there’s a very, very large timing response.”

The $498.7 billion in capital gains in 2012 were concentrated among the highest-earning households. U.S. taxpayers with more than $250,000 in adjusted gross income received 83 percent of the net capital gains.

Those taxpayers, who represented 2.4 percent of U.S. tax returns filed, received 28 percent of adjusted gross income.

To contact the reporter on this story: Richard Rubin in Washington at rrubin12@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Jodi Schneider at jschneider50@bloomberg.net Steven Komarow

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