Putin Allies Targeted by U.S., EU Sanctions Over Ukraine Crisis

Photographer: Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg

Vladislav Surkov, Russia's deputy prime minister, pauses during a session at the Open Innovations International Forum for Innovative Development in Moscow, Russia, on Oct. 31, 2012. Close

Vladislav Surkov, Russia's deputy prime minister, pauses during a session at the Open... Read More

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Photographer: Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg

Vladislav Surkov, Russia's deputy prime minister, pauses during a session at the Open Innovations International Forum for Innovative Development in Moscow, Russia, on Oct. 31, 2012.

U.S. President Barack Obama imposed sanctions on seven senior Russian officials and four Crimeans and Ukrainians deemed responsible for the move to annex the Black Sea peninsula, selecting figures close to President Vladimir Putin or involved in crafting the Kremlin’s policy on Ukraine. The EU imposed sanctions on 21 Ukrainian and Russian individuals.

The following is the list of those targeted. They are all now subject to travel bans and asset freezes. Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, declined to comment on the sanctions.

RUSSIAN OFFICIALS:

* Valentina Matviyenko

As the speaker of the Federation Council, the upper house of parliament, she is third in line on the ladder of executive power after Putin and Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev. A former mayor of Putin’s home town of St. Petersburg, she oversaw parliament’s approval of the president’s request to use the military in Ukraine on March 1 and said the upper chamber was preparing a request to recall Russia’s ambassador to the U.S. [U.S. sanctions list]

* Dmitry Rogozin

Russia’s former ambassador to NATO, Rogozin oversees the country’s military industry as deputy prime minister. Prior to his appointment as an envoy to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, he led the now-defunct nationalist party Rodina, or Motherland. [U.S. sanctions list]

* Vladislav Surkov

An aide to Putin, Surkov came to prominence as a Kremlin ideologue who crafted the concept of “managed democracy” in Russia. Surkov, who oversaw domestic politics as first deputy head of the Kremlin administration before his move to the cabinet in 2012, resigned as deputy prime minister last year. [U.S. sanctions list]

* Sergei Glazyev

An economist and adviser to Putin responsible for post-Soviet integration who’s accused the West of meddling in Ukraine’s sovereign affairs. A former State Duma deputy who ran for president in 2004, he was considered to replace Sergey Ignatiev as the Russian central bank’s chairman in 2013, according to Reuters. [U.S. sanctions list]

* Sergei Mironov

Member of the Council of the State Duma and leader of the Just Russia party faction in the lower house of parliament. A former speaker of the upper house, Mironov in 2007 urged Putin to sidestep a constitutional ban on three consecutive terms and extend his tenure in the Kremlin. In 2004, Mironov ran for president while supporting Putin in the same race. He was a candidate again in the 2012 election. [EU sanctions list]

* Yelena Mizulina

A lawmaker in the State Duma, where she leads the committee on family, women and children affairs and represents the Just Russia party, she helped draft legislation criticized by the West as being anti-gay. [U.S. sanctions list]

* Leonid Slutsky

Head of the lower house of parliament’s committee responsible for ties with the Commonwealth of Independent States, a loose grouping of ex-Soviet republics that includes Ukraine. Responsible for “actively supporting” the use of Russian armed forces in Ukraine and the annexation of Crimea, according to the EU. [U.S. and EU sanctions lists]

* Sergei Zheleznyak

Deputy speaker of the lower house of parliament. He’s responsible for “actively supporting” the use of Russian armed forces in Ukraine and the annexation of Crimea, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Evgeni Bushmin

Deputy speaker of the upper house of Russia’s parliament. He publicly supported the deployment of Russian forces in Ukraine, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Vladimir Dzhabarov

First deputy chairman of the International Affairs Committee of the upper house of Russia’s parliament. He publicly supported the deployment of Russian forces in Ukraine, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Oleg Panteleev

First deputy chairman of the Committee on Parliamentary Issues. He publicly supported the deployment of Russian forces in Ukraine, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Nikolai Ryzhkov

Member of the Committee for Federal Issues, Regional Politics and the North in the upper house of Russia’s parliament. He publicly supported the deployment of Russian forces in Ukraine, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Aleksandr Totoonov

Member of the Committee on Culture, Science, and Information in the upper house of Russia’s parliament. He publicly supported the deployment of Russian forces in Ukraine, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Andrei Klishas

Head of the upper house Federation Council’s committee on constitutional legislation. He publicly supported the deployment of Russian forces in Ukraine, according to the EU. [EU and U.S. sanctions lists]

* Viktor Ozerov

Chairman of the Security and Defense Committee in the upper house of Russia’s parliament. He publicly supported the deployment of Russian forces in Ukraine, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Aleksandr Galkin

Commander of Russia’s Southern Military District, which controls the Black Sea Fleet, based in the Crimean port of Sevastopol. He is responsible for “part of the Russian military presence in Crimea,” according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Anatoliy Sidorov

Commander, Russia’s Western Military District, units of which are deployed in Crimea, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Aleksandr Vitko

Commander of the Black Sea Fleet, Vice-Admiral. He is responsible for commanding Russian forces that have occupied Ukrainian sovereign territory, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

UKRAINIAN OFFICIALS:

* Viktor Yanukovych

Ukraine’s president before he was ousted in February after three months of anti-government protests. Yanukovych, who has since fled to Russia, has claimed he remains the legitimate head of state. [U.S. sanctions list]

* Viktor Medvedchuk

The head of the presidential administration under former Ukrainian leader Leonid Kuchma from 2002 to 2005, he’s said Putin is his daughter’s godfather. Medvedchuk has been seen with the Russian leader during informal events such as martial arts tournaments. His Ukrainian Choice movement campaigned against a trade pact with the EU and for the country’s integration into the Customs Union, a Moscow-led economic bloc. [U.S. sanctions list]

* Sergei Aksenov

Crimea’s prime minister, he led an effort to hold a March 16 secession referendum. Installed during an emergency session of the Crimean parliament after gunmen took over the legislature’s building last month, he asked Russia for help in securing independence from Ukraine. [EU and U.S. sanctions lists]

* Vladimir Konstantinov

Speaker of Crimea’s parliament, who along with Aksenov was accused by the Ukrainian government in Kiev of staging an attempted coup. [EU and U.S. sanctions lists]

* Rustam Temirgaliev

As deputy prime minister of Crimea, Temirgaliev played a relevant role in the decisions taken by the regional legislature concerning the referendum against territorial integrity of Ukraine, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Sergey Tsekov

Deputy speaker of the Crimean parliament, Tsekov was instrumental in dismissing the Crimean government and was one of the first Crimean leaders to ask in public for annexation of Crimea to Russia, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Pyotr Zima

Zima was appointed as the new head of the Crimean Security Service on 3 March 2014 and played a “relevant role in preventing Ukraine’s authorities from controlling the territory of Crimea,” according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Deniz Berezovskiy

Berezovskiy was appointed commander of the Ukrainian Navy on 1 March 2014 and swore an oath to the Crimean armed force, thereby breaking his oath, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Aleksei Chaliy

Chaliy became Mayor of Sevastopol by popular acclamation on 23 February 2014 and accepted this vote, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

* Yuriy Zherebtsov

Zherebtsov was one of the leading organizers of the referendum against Ukraine’s territorial integrity, according to the EU. [EU sanctions list]

To contact the reporters on this story: Henry Meyer in Moscow at hmeyer4@bloomberg.net; Stephen Bierman in Moscow at sbierman1@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Balazs Penz at bpenz@bloomberg.net; Will Kennedy at wkennedy3@bloomberg.net Paul Abelsky, Fergal O’Brien

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