NFL Considers Moving Extra Point to 42 Yards, NFL.com Reports

Photographer: Justin Edmonds/Getty Images

Mike Scifres #5 of the San Diego Chargers punts against the Denver Broncos during the AFC Divisional Playoff Game at Sports Authority Field at Mile High on Jan. 12, 2014 in Denver. Close

Mike Scifres #5 of the San Diego Chargers punts against the Denver Broncos during the... Read More

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Photographer: Justin Edmonds/Getty Images

Mike Scifres #5 of the San Diego Chargers punts against the Denver Broncos during the AFC Divisional Playoff Game at Sports Authority Field at Mile High on Jan. 12, 2014 in Denver.

The National Football League’s Competition Committee is in preliminary talks about moving the ball to the 25-yard line for point-after-touchdown attempts, forcing teams to make 42-yard kicks, according to NFL.com.

Teams scoring touchdowns now get the ball on the two-yard-line with the option of kicking it for one point or running or passing for two. The two-point option, which has been used in college football since 1958, was adopted by the NFL in 1994.

With the ball currently spotted at the 2-yard line, kickers attempt 19-yard conversions. Last season, teams missed only five of 1,267 attempts, or a 99.6 percent success rate. The conversion rate from 40 to 49 yards for field-goal tries was 83 percent.

“The extra point is almost automatic,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in a January interview with the league-owned NFL Network. “You want to add excitement with every play so there have been some proposals.”

Goodell said one change the league has considered is doing away with point-after kicks entirely and awarding seven points for a touchdown. Teams then would be given the option to run or pass for an eighth point, with a failed attempt lowering the value of their touchdown to six.

Photographer: Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

Teams scoring touchdowns now get the ball on the two-yard-line with the option of kicking it for one point or running or passing for two. The two-point option, which has been used in college football since 1958, was adopted by the National Football League in 1994. Close

Teams scoring touchdowns now get the ball on the two-yard-line with the option of... Read More

Close
Open
Photographer: Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

Teams scoring touchdowns now get the ball on the two-yard-line with the option of kicking it for one point or running or passing for two. The two-point option, which has been used in college football since 1958, was adopted by the National Football League in 1994.

There isn’t a consensus on what type of change will be made and it might lead to experimentation during the preseason, NFL.com said, citing a member of the committee it didn’t identify.

To contact the reporter on this story: Mason Levinson in New York at mlevinson@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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