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Weak Storm Sweeps East While Deep Chill Grips Midwest Overnight

A storm moving through the eastern U.S. may bring as much as 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) of snow to Washington and lesser amounts to New York and Boston overnight.

The snow will arrive in Washington between 2 a.m. to 4 a.m. and continue to fall until about noon, local time, according to the National Weather Service office in Sterling, Virginia.

“Snow accumulation will affect the morning commute,” the weather service said. “Untreated roadways will be slick.”

A winter weather advisory has been issued from southern Indiana to southern New Jersey, warning there may be some travel delays on roads, according to the weather service. As much as 5 inches of snow may fall in the mountains of West Virginia.

The storm is weak and probably won’t have a great impact in most places, said Brett Anderson, a meteorologist with AccuWeather Inc. in State College, Pennsylvania. An inch or less is expected to fall in New York and Boston.

While the snow comes across the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, temperatures will plummet in the Midwest. Readings in Chicago are forecast to drop to zero overnight, the weather service said.

A wind chill advisory is in place from Montana to western Ohio, including Chicago and Minneapolis. Temperatures across the area may feel a cold as minus 30 degrees.

“This will result in frost bite and lead to hypothermia if precautions are not taken,” the weather service said.

The cold is expected to take hold across the Midwest and spread to the Northeast. Most of the eastern U.S. has a high chance of lower than normal temperatures from March 3 to March 11, according to the U.S. Climate Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland.

Temperatures will be 15 degrees or more below normal from Montana to western New York starting today through March 1, according to Commodity Weather Group LLC in Bethesda, Maryland. Readings of at least 8 degrees below normal will persist across New England and the rest of the Northeast during the same time period.

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at bsullivan10@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Alexander Kwiatkowski at akwiatkowsk2@bloomberg.net

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