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Mister Donut or Flappy Bird? Global Tech's Top 5 Stories

Photographer: Katsumi Kasahara

A Mister Donut outlet in Tokyo in 2007. There are more than 1,100 locations in Japan. Close

A Mister Donut outlet in Tokyo in 2007. There are more than 1,100 locations in Japan.

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Photographer: Katsumi Kasahara

A Mister Donut outlet in Tokyo in 2007. There are more than 1,100 locations in Japan.

You probably remember Pan Am, Mister Donut and Napster. You may not remember Bucky Beaver hawking a popular mid-century toothpaste called Ipana.

All these names, whether iconic or obscure, are proof that many old brands never die. Long after fading away in the U.S., these zombie brands can be found alive and well in distant corners of the globe.

This story, by Bloomberg's Mark Milian, is this week's top Global Tech feature.

Here are the other top reads.

Apple Wooed by Arizona as Obama Seeks U.S. Jobs Comeback

Last year, when Apple was searching for a place to house a factory that makes a stronger glass for its gadgets, Mesa, a suburb of Phoenix, pulled out the stops. The Arizona city offered tax breaks, built power lines, fast-tracked building permits and got the state to declare a vacant 1.3 million-square-foot facility that Apple was exploring a foreign trade zone. With unemployment high, such are the lengths that towns are willing to go to to lure the world’s most valuable company.

Facebook’s Sandberg Wooed by French President Seeking Startup Buzz

In the first official trip by a French president to San Francisco in 30 years, Francois Hollande sought to woo Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg, Google’s Eric Schmidt and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey into investing more in France. Hollande’s visit was aimed at underscoring new business-friendly policies he’s unveiled this year.

Tycoon’s Threat to Set Himself Ablaze Shows T-Mobile Grit

In SoftBank billionaire Masayoshi Son, U.S. regulators are sampling the resolve of a self-made tycoon who once threatened to set himself afire at a Japanese government ministry. After meeting with Son, regulators have said they’re skeptical about his Sprint buying No. 4 U.S. mobile provider T-Mobile US, not wanting to see the number of national wireless carriers shrink to three. Still, Son is starting to make the case for the acquisition.

‘Flappy Bird’ Grounded as Vietnamese Developer Pulls Plug on App

The Hanoi developer who removed his “Flappy Bird” game from app stores after becoming a global sensation and earning as much as $50,000 a day experienced the kind of success few individual programmers encounter. However, he said in a Twitter message that the game “ruins my simple life.”

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