Most Read on Bloomberg: Tennis Gambling, Suntory’s Bourbon Love

The following list comprises the most-read Bloomberg News reports from the past week.

Lists are based on daily statistics through Friday.

STORIES

1. Tennis Quant’s System Doubles Money Without Knowing Players

Jan. 16 (Bloomberg) -- For someone who says he bets millions of dollars on tennis a year, sports gambler Elihu Feustel doesn’t watch many matches.

2. U.S. Stocks Slip Most in Two Months on Valuations as Dollar Slumps

Jan. 13 (Bloomberg) -- U.S. stocks fell the most since November, cementing the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index’s worst start to a year since 2009 as investors weighed equity valuations and the outlook for economic stimulus. The dollar slid to a three-week low against the yen and Treasuries rose.

3. Suntory to Buy Beam in $16 Billion Deal to Gain Maker’s Mark

Jan. 14 (Bloomberg) -- Suntory Holdings Ltd., the closely held Japanese whiskey and beer maker, agreed to buy Beam Inc. for $16 billion including debt to gain brands such as Maker’s Mark whiskey and create the world’s third-largest premium spirits company.

4. Goldman 10% Return Tied to CEO Pay Too Low for Investors

Jan. 13 (Bloomberg) -- Goldman Sachs Group Inc. investors want a target for annual returns -- as long as it’s higher than the one that pays a bonus to Chief Executive Officer Lloyd C. Blankfein and his top deputies.

5. BofA’s Quarterly Profit Quadruples as Mortgage Costs Ebb

Jan. 15 (Bloomberg) -- Bank of America Corp., the second-biggest U.S. lender, quadrupled its quarterly profit and beat Wall Street estimates as the company quelled claims tied to defective mortgages. The stock reached its highest level in more than three years.

6. Credit Suisse Tells Junior Bankers to Avoid Office on Saturdays

Jan. 14 (Bloomberg) -- Credit Suisse Group AG, Switzerland’s second-largest lender, told junior investment bankers to take much of their weekends off as Wall Street firms seek to improve working conditions.

7. Bonus-Cap Exemptions Threatened by Veto From EU Lawmakers

Jan. 14 (Bloomberg) -- Bonus-cap exemptions championed by the European Union’s banking regulator may be vetoed by EU lawmakers who said they’ll fight a weakening of curbs on excessive payouts.

8. U.S. Stocks Rebound After Retail Sales as Treasuries to Yen Fall

Jan. 14 (Bloomberg) -- U.S. stocks rose, with benchmark indexes rebounding from their biggest drops this year, while Treasuries retreated as retail sales climbed more than economists predicted in December. Emerging-market stocks fell and the yen weakened while natural gas gained a third day.

9. Sailors Starving on Stranded Ships See Bigger Peril Than Pirates

Jan. 15 (Bloomberg) -- Hassan Sabrah hadn’t eaten in four days.

That’s when the chief engineer of the Moldova-flagged cargo ship JSM finally snapped, according to interviews with sailors, the port manager and local residents. He picked up a rock and hit his captain on the back of the head. Before the ship’s cook could pull Sabrah away, the captain’s blood was everywhere.

10. JPMorgan Profit Drops 7.3% After Madoff Legal Settlements

Jan. 14 (Bloomberg) -- JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s quarterly profit fell 7.3 percent on $2.6 billion of settlements tied to Bernard Madoff’s Ponzi scheme as rising legal costs ended the firm’s three-year streak of record annual earnings.

COLUMNS

1. Kim Jong Un’s $5 Trillion Price Is Worth Paying: William Pesek

Jan. 17 (Bloomberg) -- As Park Geun Hye searches for ways to compete with China and Japan, the South Korean president is eyeing a rather surprising ally: Kim Jong Un.

2. Ex-Stratton Oakmont Broker Is Having a Bad Week: Jonathan Weil

Jan. 17 (Bloomberg) -- Normally it wouldn’t be news that a small-fry stock hustler like Christopher F. Veale got busted for allegedly churning an octogenarian customer’s account. But here’s why it is now: He used to work at Stratton Oakmont Inc., the boiler room depicted in the movie “The Wolf of Wall Street.” So when the state of Massachusetts went after him, the story made headlines.

3. ‘Allah,’ the Word That’s Pulling Malaysia Apart: William Pesek

Jan. 14 (Bloomberg) -- Father Lawrence Andrew could be excused for wondering whether he’s been cast in a John le Carre conspiracy thriller -- or a farcical dispatch from the Onion.

4. When Deutsche Bank Swore Off Crime for Two Years: Jonathan Weil

Jan. 15 (Bloomberg) -- Deutsche Bank AG, the world’s biggest foreign-exchange dealer, suspended several currency traders for suspected attempts to rig rates, including some in New York, according to reports today by several news outlets. This comes amid investigations by the Justice Department, the Federal Reserve Board and other government snoops into whether the largest banks manipulated benchmark currency rates.

5. Clinton’s Non-Campaign Needs Someone to Take Charge: Albert Hunt

Jan. 13 (Bloomberg) -- The hottest story in U.S. politics last week, at least before the implosion of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, was an article in Politico detailing Hillary Clinton’s shadow 2016 presidential campaign.  

MULTIMEDIA

1. Hollande Says Must Cut Spending to Reduce Taxes

Jan. 14 (Bloomberg) -- French President Francois Hollande  discusses cuts in public spending, taxation and euro-area  economic governance.

2. Knottenbelt Says Tennis ‘Attractive’ to Online Gamblers

Jan. 16 (Bloomberg) -- William Knottenbelt, a professor in the Department of Computing at Imperial College in London,  talks about the use of algorithms by Internet gamblers to bet  on tennis Grand Slams.

3. Bernanke Says QE Helped, Poses No Immediate Bubble Risk

Jan. 16 (Bloomberg) -- Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S.  Bernanke defends quantitative easing during an event at the  Brookings Institution. 

4. Marc Faber Sees ‘Gigantic’ Asset Bubble, Slowing Growth

Jan. 14 (Bloomberg) -- Marc Faber, publisher of the Gloom, Boom & Doom report, talks about the impact of Federal Reserve  policy on the global economy, Bitcoin and financial markets.  

5. Carney on U.K. House-Price Growth: Hearing in a Minute

Jan. 15 (Bloomberg) -- Bank of England Governor Mark  Carney comments on his expectations for a further strengthening of Britain’s property market this year during testimony before  the U.K. Parliament’s Treasury Committee on financial  stability.

To contact the reporter on this story: Audrey Barker in New York at abarker3@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Alec McCabe at amccabe@bloomberg.net

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