Nobel Prize Winner Liu Appeals Conviction in China, Lawyer Says

Photographer: Heiko Junge/Scanpix Norway/AFP via Getty Images

A file photo from Dec. 2010 shows an empty chair with a diploma and medal that should have been awarded to jailed Chinese political activist Liu Xiaobo, in Oslo. Close

A file photo from Dec. 2010 shows an empty chair with a diploma and medal that should... Read More

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Photographer: Heiko Junge/Scanpix Norway/AFP via Getty Images

A file photo from Dec. 2010 shows an empty chair with a diploma and medal that should have been awarded to jailed Chinese political activist Liu Xiaobo, in Oslo.

Jailed Chinese political activist Liu Xiaobo, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2010, is appealing his conviction for subversion, his lawyer said.

Liu gave approval to his wife Liu Xia to entrust his lawyers to file the appeal last week, lawyer Mo Shaoping said today by phone. Liu was sentenced to 11 years in prison in late 2009 after he helped organize Charter 08, a letter signed by more than 300 Chinese academics, lawyers and activists calling for direct elections and freedom of assembly.

Asked if the appeal of the verdict against Liu would be successful, Mo said: “I don’t want to predict this.”

“He believes that fundamentally he is not guilty and this is a wrong judgment,” Mo said.

Liu was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize “for his long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China,” according to a statement by the Norwegian Nobel Committee in Oslo. China protested the decision to award him the prize.

A Beijing court rejected Liu’s appeal of his sentence in February 2010, the Associated Press reported at the time. Liu’s wife is under house arrest in Beijing, the AP reported in June.

To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Henry Sanderson in Beijing at hsanderson@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Rosalind Mathieson at rmathieson3@bloomberg.net

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