Frank Gehry to Design His First Project in London at Battersea

Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg

An advertising billboard shows residential development information outside Battersea power station in London. Close

An advertising billboard shows residential development information outside Battersea... Read More

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Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg

An advertising billboard shows residential development information outside Battersea power station in London.

Frank Gehry’s architecture firm and Foster + Partners will design a shopping street and apartment buildings as part of London’s Battersea Power Station redevelopment. It will be Gehry’s first project in the U.K. capital.

Gehry Partners and Foster + Partners will design 1,200 apartments, a 200-room hotel and 350,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space, London-based Battersea Power Station Development Company said in a statement today.

The historically protected power station, featured on the cover of Pink Floyd’s 1977 album “Animals,” was bought by a group of Malaysian investors led by SP Setia Bhd. (SPSB) and Sime Darby Bhd. (SIME) last year for 400 million pounds ($647 million). Gehry, winner of the 1989 Pritzker Prize for architecture, is known for projects including the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, the Dancing House in Prague and Disney Hall in Los Angeles.

The design firms will cooperate on a shopping street in the Battersea project’s third phase and they will each build one residential area near the retail center, according to the statement. The area is part of the Vauxhall Nine Elms Battersea Opportunity Area south of the River Thames, London’ largest urban redevelopment. In addition to homes and shops, it includes a new U.S. embassy and an extension of the London underground.

The Battersea Power Station master plan, designed by Rafel Vinoly, spans 39 acres and includes more than 3,400 homes as well as offices and retail space, according to today’s statement. The completed development will be worth 8 billion pounds, SP Setia and Sime Darby said last year.

“Our goal is to help create a neighborhood and a place for people to live that respects the iconic Battersea Power Station while connecting it into the broader fabric of the city,” Gehry said in the statement.

To contact the reporter on this story: Dalia Fahmy in Berlin at dfahmy1@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Ross Larsen at rlarsen2@bloomberg.net; Andrew Blackman at ablackman@bloomberg.net

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