Quarterback Flynn Signs With Bills After Being Cut by Raiders

Photographer: Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

In six National Football League seasons, quarterback Matt Flynn, recently released from the Oakland Raiders, has completed 62.3 percent of his passes for 1,329 yards and 10 touchdowns, with six interceptions. Close

In six National Football League seasons, quarterback Matt Flynn, recently released from... Read More

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Photographer: Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

In six National Football League seasons, quarterback Matt Flynn, recently released from the Oakland Raiders, has completed 62.3 percent of his passes for 1,329 yards and 10 touchdowns, with six interceptions.

The Buffalo Bills signed quarterback Matt Flynn, one week after he was released by the Oakland Raiders.

Flynn was sacked seven times, fumbled twice and threw an interception that was returned for a touchdown against the Washington Redskins on Sept. 29, his lone start of the season.

Flynn, 28, played for the Green Bay Packers as a backup to Aaron Rodgers from 2008 to 2011. After he threw for 480 yards and six touchdowns in the Packers’ 2011 season finale, both franchise records, he signed with the Seattle Seahawks on a three-year, $19.5 million contract. Seahawks rookie Russell Wilson won the starting job in preseason and Flynn was traded to Oakland in April.

In six NFL seasons, Flynn has completed 62.3 percent of his passes for 1,329 yards and 10 touchdowns, with six interceptions.

The Bills placed defensive back Jonathan Meeks on injured reserve for at least six weeks to make room on the roster for Flynn, the team said in a statement.

Thad Lewis played quarterback in Buffalo’s 27-24 overtime loss to Cincinnati yesterday. The Bills are without rookie starter EJ Manuel, who sprained his right knee on Oct. 3.

To contact the reporters on this story: Eben Novy-Williams in New York at enovywilliam@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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