UN Report to Show Chemical Weapons Were Used in Syria, Ban Says

In this Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013 citizen journalism image provided by the United media office of Arbeen which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, members of the UN investigation team take samples from sand near a part of a missile that is likely to be one of the chemical rockets according to activists, in the Damascus countryside of Ain Terma, Syria. Photograph: United media office of Arbeen via AP Photo Close

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In this Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013 citizen journalism image provided by the United media office of Arbeen which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, members of the UN investigation team take samples from sand near a part of a missile that is likely to be one of the chemical rockets according to activists, in the Damascus countryside of Ain Terma, Syria. Photograph: United media office of Arbeen via AP Photo

A report by United Nations inspectors will show that chemical weapons were used on Aug. 21 in Syria, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said today.

A team has been analyzing evidence gathered in Syria about the attack in the eastern suburbs of Damascus, which the U.S. says was launched by Syrian government forces and killed more than 1,400 people.

Ban, in comments today at a UN development forum in New York, said the inspectors’ report will be released “as soon as possible.”

The UN chief said he is “very much troubled” by divisions over Syria among members of the UN Security Council, which hasn’t been able to adopt any resolutions on humanitarian, political and security issues regarding Syria during 2 1/2 years of conflict.

If the deadlock continues it will represent a “failure” by the UN, Ban said.

While it is up to the Syrian people to decide whether to oust President Bashar al-Assad, Ban said, the regime’s leader has “committed many crimes against humanity” and will be held accountable when the conflict is over.

To contact the reporter on this story: Sangwon Yoon in United Nations at syoon32@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Bob Drummond at bdrummond@bloomberg.net

Photographer: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

While it is up to the Syrian people to decide whether to oust President Bashar al-Assad, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said, the regime’s leader has “committed many crimes against humanity” and will be held accountable when the conflict is over. Close

While it is up to the Syrian people to decide whether to oust President Bashar... Read More

Close
Open
Photographer: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

While it is up to the Syrian people to decide whether to oust President Bashar al-Assad, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said, the regime’s leader has “committed many crimes against humanity” and will be held accountable when the conflict is over.

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