Breaking News

Tweet TWEET

Imperial College London Tops Cambridge, Oxford as Best for Jobs

Imperial College London, which focuses on science and medicine, is the U.K.’s best university for job prospects, achieving positive outcomes for 89 percent of its graduates, according to a study.

Imperial beat the University of Cambridge, where 85 percent of undergraduates find jobs or graduate school opportunities within six months of leaving school, according to a report released today that was commissioned by the Times of London. The universities of Bath, Buckingham and Durham round out the top five, while the University of Oxford was 13th.

The U.K. government last year allowed universities to almost triple the cost of undergraduate education and charge as much as 9,000 pounds ($14,000) annually. The higher costs have raised expectations of students and parents for job training that aren’t being met by the schools, according to the study, with 52 percent of surveyed employers saying few or no graduates are ready for work. Employers also say the course of study is more important than grades earned or the university attended.

“With the typical degree now costing 27,000 pounds in tuition fees alone, students have a right to be better prepared for the battleground that is the graduate jobs market,” Alastair McCall, an editor of the newspaper’s Good University Guide, said in the statement. The typical undergraduate program in Britain lasts three years.

Imperial College, based in London’s South Kensington neighborhood, was founded in 1907 and has about 14,000 students. Graduates include Ian Read, the chairman and chief executive officer of Pfizer Inc., and Brian May, guitarist for rock band Queen.

To contact the reporter on this story: Oliver Staley in London at ostaley@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Lisa Wolfson at lwolfson@bloomberg.net

Press spacebar to pause and continue. Press esc to stop.

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.