Beau Biden to Return to Delaware Tomorrow After Tests

Photographer: Scott Eells/Bloomberg

Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden, son of U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden, first felt weak and disoriented while driving to Indiana on Aug. 14, according to a statement from his office. Close

Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden, son of U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden, first... Read More

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Photographer: Scott Eells/Bloomberg

Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden, son of U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden, first felt weak and disoriented while driving to Indiana on Aug. 14, according to a statement from his office.

Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden, son of Vice President Joe Biden, underwent an unspecified procedure yesterday at a Houston cancer-treatment hospital where he was being examined after an episode of disorientation and weakness last week.

The younger Biden, 44, will be discharged from the hospital and return to Delaware tomorrow, the vice president said today in a statement released by his office. Without describing the treatment or the nature of his son’s illness, the vice president called the procedure “successful.”

“He is in great shape and is going to be discharged tomorrow and heading home to Delaware,” Joe Biden said. “He will follow up with his local physicians in the coming weeks.”

Beau Biden will speak with Delaware’s chief deputy attorney general and the state prosecutor tomorrow following his return to Wilmington, according to an e-mailed statement from Jason Miller, a spokesman for Delaware Department of Justice.

Biden is being treated at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, according to a person familiar with the situation who isn’t authorized to talk publicly about it. U.S. News & World Report ranks MD Anderson No. 1 in the nation for cancer care, and has done so for the past seven years, according to the hospital’s website.

Miller had declined to confirm where he is being treated.

Biden yesterday posted on Twitter a picture of himself and his wife, Hallie, in Houston. “Touched by all your well wishes -- thank you,” he wrote. The couple has two children.

Trip Canceled

The elder Biden, 70, accompanied his son to Houston earlier this week, flying from Delaware, according to the vice president’s office. He remained in the city yesterday and today, according to the schedule released by his office.

The vice president has canceled plans to attend a fundraiser for New Hampshire Governor Maggie Hassan, an event at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island, and a Democratic National Committee fundraiser at a private home, his office said.

He is still scheduled to join President Barack Obama at an event on Aug. 23 in Scranton, Pennsylvania, the vice president’s birthplace. His family moved to Delaware during his childhood.

Beau Biden was treated for a mild stroke in 2010. A Democrat, he decided earlier that year to forgo seeking the U.S. Senate seat his father had held for 36 years and relinquished after winning election as vice president on Obama’s presidential ticket in 2008.

The attorney general talked by phone on Aug. 19 with his chief deputy, Ian McConnel, and his chief of staff, Timothy Mullaney, Miller said.

Iraq Veteran

Biden first felt weak and disoriented while driving to Indiana on Aug. 14, according to a statement from his office. After meeting with his doctor at Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia later in the week, he spent the weekend at home.

Elected Delaware attorney general in 2006, Biden is an officer in the Army National Guard and served a yearlong deployment in Iraq. He won re-election in 2010, getting almost 80 percent of the vote.

He survived a car crash in December 1972 that killed his mother and 1-year-old sister. He and his younger brother, Hunter, were seriously injured in the collision, which occurred just weeks after his father was first elected to the U.S. Senate.

The elder Biden married his current wife, Jill, in 1977, and one daughter was born to them. The vice president underwent surgery twice in 1988 to repair two cranial aneurysms.

To contact the reporters on this story: Jonathan D. Salant in Washington at jsalant@bloomberg.net; Kathleen Miller in Washington at kmiller01@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Jeanne Cummings at jcummings21@bloomberg.net

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