Alex Rodriguez Files Appeal Against Doping Ban With Arbitrator

Alex Rodriguez’s appeal of a 211-game doping suspension was officially filed with an independent arbitrator by the Major League Baseball Players’ Union.

“The MLBPA filed the grievance today,” union spokesman Greg Bouris said last night in an e-mail.

New York Yankees third baseman Rodriguez, 38, was suspended without pay through the 2014 season on Aug. 5. MLB Commissioner Bud Selig accused Rodriguez of using testosterone and human growth hormone over “multiple years” and of trying to “obstruct and frustrate” baseball’s investigation of performance-enhancing substances supplied from a now-shuttered clinic in Miami.

Rodriguez is allowed to play during the appeal. He joined the Yankees for the first time this season on Aug. 5 after hip surgery in January.

“I don’t think any of us thought it was going to be any different,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi told reporters. “It’s part of the process that was negotiated between MLB and the players’ association and you let it play out. I expect him to play a lot. We need him to help us.”

Rodriguez flied out twice, struck out, singled, walked and grounded out in a 6-5 loss to the Chicago White Sox in 12 innings last night. He returned to third base and batted third for the Yankees.

New York opened a 4-0 lead through four innings at U.S Cellular Field. Chicago tied it in the ninth and New York took the lead again in the 12th on a Robinson Cano home run.

Alejandro De Aza’s triple in the bottom of the inning scored Tyler Flowers and Alexei Ramirez to secure the win for the White Sox (43-69).

The Yankees (57-56) are in fourth place in the American League East, 11 1/2 games behind the Boston Red Sox, who beat the Houston Astros 7-5 last night.

To contact the reporter on this story: Nancy Kercheval in Washington at nkercheval@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dex McLuskey at dmcluskey@bloomberg.net

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