Senate Confirms Samantha Power as U.S. Envoy to UN, 87-10

Photographer: Andrew Harer/Bloomberg

U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, then senior director of multilateral affairs with the White House National Security Council, looks on as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., on June 5, 2013. Close

U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, then senior director of... Read More

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Photographer: Andrew Harer/Bloomberg

U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, then senior director of multilateral affairs with the White House National Security Council, looks on as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., on June 5, 2013.

The Senate voted 87 to 10 to confirm Samantha Power as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

Power, 42, was nominated by President Barack Obama on June 5, and previously served on the staff of the White House National Security Council. She’s a human-rights activist and former journalist who won a Pulitzer Prize for a 2002 book about U.S. policy in Bosnia and Rwanda titled “A Problem From Hell: America and the Age of Genocide.”

“She has been a tireless defender of human rights and she has seen the tragedy of human suffering firsthand,” New Jersey Senator Robert Menendez, a Democrat and chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said on the Senate floor before today’s vote.

Senator Marco Rubio of Florida was one of ten senators, all Republicans, who voted against Power’s nomination. Rubio said he couldn’t support her because she hasn’t pledged to take “significant steps” to revamp the United Nations.

Power succeeds Susan Rice, who left the UN post to become Obama’s national security adviser in June.

To contact the reporter on this story: David Lerman in Washington at dlerman1@bloomberg.net

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