Andy Murray’s Wimbledon Victory Boosts Champagne Sales

(Corrects date in fourth paragraph.)

Andy Murray’s Wimbledon success has helped boost U.K. sales of Lanson-branded champagne as Britons celebrated the Scottish tennis player’s victory, according to Paul Beavis, the head of Lanson-BCC (LAN)’s U.K. unit.

Lanson, the official champagne of the London-based grand-slam tennis tournament, has sold “towards the top end” of the 15,000 to 20,000 bottles it expects to offload during a typical championship fortnight, Beavis said in a phone interview yesterday.

“There’s been a real Wimbledon fever,” he said. “As soon as Murray won, the champagne bar got incredibly busy.”

Murray, 26, beat the world number one Novak Djokovic in straight sets on July 7 to win his first Wimbledon title. He was the first British man to win the singles event in 77 years.

Lanson’s U.K. sales have picked up over the past three months after a “difficult” first quarter hit by subdued consumer spending, Beavis said. The improvement was aided by warmer weather, the introduction of a new White Label cuvee, and limited-edition champagne bottles with free cooling jackets in the style of a Wimbledon tennis shirt, he said.

“It’s not a lot better, but it is better” than last year, Beavis said. “The good weather makes everyone go out and spend money.” Lanson shares have fallen about 12 percent over the past 12 months, compared with a 22 percent gain on the Paris CAC 40 Index.

The U.K. accounts for as much as 45 percent of Lanson champagne’s global sales, according to Beavis. The Reims, France-based company reported an 8.4 percent increase in first-quarter champagne revenue, it said in May. Lanson has been a sponsor of the Wimbledon tournament for 25 years and has extended its contract for another five years.

To contact the reporter on this story: Clementine Fletcher in London at cfletcher5@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Celeste Perri at cperri@bloomberg.net

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