Ford F-150 Beats Toyota Camry in American-Made Ranking

The F-150 snapped a four-year streak for the Camry and earned the No. 1 spot in Cars.com’s 2013 American-Made index. The index ranksSource: Ford Motor Co. Close

The F-150 snapped a four-year streak for the Camry and earned the No. 1 spot in... Read More

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The F-150 snapped a four-year streak for the Camry and earned the No. 1 spot in Cars.com’s 2013 American-Made index. The index ranksSource: Ford Motor Co.

Ford Motor Co. (F)’s F-150 pickup, pacing the biggest gain in U.S. market share among automakers this year, topped a consumer website’s list of most-American made models, replacing Toyota Motor Corp. (7203)’s Camry sedan.

The F-150 snapped a four-year streak for the Camry and earned the No. 1 spot in Cars.com’s 2013 American-Made index, the website said today in an e-mailed statement. The index ranks model lines based on their sales and whether car or truck parts and completed vehicles are built in the U.S.

Ford’s F-Series trucks have propelled the biggest U.S. sales increase among major automakers this year, climbing 22 percent through the end of May. The automaker said last month that it’s adding 2,000 workers and a third shift at its F-150 factory in Missouri to increase pickup production beginning in the third quarter. The F-150 also is assembled at a plant in Dearborn, Michigan, where the company is based.

“Ford’s top ranking this year is a good indicator of how pickup trucks are dominating auto sales so far in 2013, and how the domestic automakers are bouncing back,” Patrick Olsen, Cars.com’s editor-in-chief, said in the statement.

While the assembly point and domestic parts content of the F-150 didn’t change from 2012 to 2013, vehicle sales are responsible for bumping the F-150 to the top spot, Olsen said.

The Camry, which ranked second in the index, is assembled at plants in Kentucky and Indiana. Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. (7270), 17 percent owned by Toyota, produces the Indiana-made Camrys.

Automakers and lobbying groups such as the American Automotive Policy Council have criticized the index in the past for using criteria that resulted in Toyota City, Japan-based Toyota placing first in its study.

Index Methodology

“The Cars.com methodology would be more accurate if it accounted for such factors as vehicle assembly, company headquarters, and research and development locations, all important factors in keeping American auto communities vibrant,” Matt Blunt, president of the Washington-based group, said in an e-mailed statement.

Ford light vehicle deliveries climbed 13 percent this year through May to 1.05 million, according to Autodata Corp. The automaker boosted its market share by 0.8 percentage point during that span to 16.4 percent, the Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey-based researcher said in an e-mailed statement.

Toyota’s Tundra was the only other pickup to make the American-Made index, holding steady year-to-year to rank seventh. The F-150 previously held the top spot on the list from 2006 to 2008.

Evenly Split

The top 10 was evenly split between domestic and foreign-owned brands. Toyota had the most models on the index’s list, taking four spots, while General Motors Co. (GM) took three and Ford, Honda Motor Co. (7267) and Chrysler Group LLC each took one place.

Cars.com is owned by Classified Ventures LLC, which also operates Apartments.com., another consumer shopping site.

Ford shares gained 2 percent to $14.97 at the close in New York while Toyota’s American depositary receipts rose 0.7 percent to $117.29. Ford has increased 16 percent this year while Toyota’s ADRs surged 26 percent and the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index rose 11 percent.

To contact the reporter on this story: Megan Durisin in Southfield, Michigan at mdurisin@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Jamie Butters at jbutters@bloomberg.net

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