Starbucks to Post Calorie Counts in All U.S. Stores

Starbucks Corp. (SBUX) is making it easier for customers to count calories.

Beginning June 25, Starbucks stores will post calorie counts on menu boards and pastry cases in all of its 11,100 U.S. cafes, the Seattle-based company said today in a statement. The posted information will be for standard drinks and won’t include options such as soy milk and sugar-free syrups.

Starbucks joins other restaurant chains, such as McDonald’s Corp. (MCD), in trying to attract Americans with more transparency around its food. The coffee seller has also been trying to make its menu healthier ahead of a pending U.S. health-law mandate that would require eateries with more than 20 locations to list calories. In 2009, Starbucks cut high-fructose corn syrup from its baked goods, and stores recently began selling salads with fewer than 450 calories.

Starbucks rose 0.3 percent to $66.24 at 9:33 a.m. in New York. Through yesterday the shares had gained 23 percent this year, while the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index increased 15 percent.

Starbucks in 2007 set nutrition standards for its new products to have fewer than 500 calories. At Starbucks, a 16-ounce latte has 190 calories, while a cheese danish packs 420 calories.

Photographer: Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg

Starbucks Corp. in 2007 set nutrition standards for its new products to have fewer than 500 calories. Close

Starbucks Corp. in 2007 set nutrition standards for its new products to have fewer than 500 calories.

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Photographer: Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg

Starbucks Corp. in 2007 set nutrition standards for its new products to have fewer than 500 calories.

McDonald’s, the world’s largest restaurant chain, in September began posting calorie counts on menu boards in the U.S. after being criticized for selling unhealthy foods. The Big Mac seller has also recently introduced lower-calorie options such as a 250-calorie egg-white breakfast sandwich.

To contact the reporter on this story: Leslie Patton in Chicago at lpatton5@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Robin Ajello at rajello@bloomberg.net

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