Eva Longoria for Latinas, Hairdo for Pelosi: D.C. Scene

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Photographer: Stephanie Green/Bloomberg

Dara Richardson-Heron, the chief executive of the YWCA USA, and Eva Longoria, actress and recipient of the Dorothy I. Height Award.

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Photographer: Stephanie Green/Bloomberg

Dara Richardson-Heron, the chief executive of the YWCA USA, and Eva Longoria, actress and recipient of the Dorothy I. Height Award. Close

Dara Richardson-Heron, the chief executive of the YWCA USA, and Eva Longoria, actress and recipient of the Dorothy I. Height Award.

Photographer: Stephanie Green/Bloomberg

Debbie Dingell, the president of D2 Strategies, and Deborah Sigmund, the founder of Innocents at Risk. Close

Debbie Dingell, the president of D2 Strategies, and Deborah Sigmund, the founder of Innocents at Risk.

Photographer: Stephanie Green/Bloomberg

Carl Ray, the makeup artist at George Salon. Close

Carl Ray, the makeup artist at George Salon.

Photographer: Stephanie Green/Bloomberg

Ismail Tekin, co-owner of George, and Rick Raines, the manager. Close

Ismail Tekin, co-owner of George, and Rick Raines, the manager.

Photographer: Stephanie Green/Bloomberg

Samantha Haar, a model at the George party. Close

Samantha Haar, a model at the George party.

“I love being in a room full of orange,” said actress Eva Longoria Friday night after receiving the Dorothy I. Height Racial Justice Award at the YWCA USA Women of Distinction Awards gala.

The YWCA’s trademark color blanketed the ballroom of the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill.

The gala was part of the YWCA’s What Women Want Annual Conference, which brings together advocates for women and girls.

The actress known for TV’s “Desperate Housewives” was honored for her Eva Longoria Foundation, which helps fellow Latinas, and Eva’s Heroes, which supports those who, like her sister, struggle with developmental challenges.

Longoria was a national co-chairman of President Barack Obama’s campaign last year, and was a commissioner for his inauguration.

Does she harbor any political ambitions of her own? “No, I just like to participate,” she said on the red carpet, wearing a form-fitting black dress and a pendant in the shape of her home state of Texas.

She said her role model was Dolores Huerta, the farm-workers activist, with whom she has formed a friendship.

Allstate Insurance Co. received the Corporate Social Responsibility Award, and retired Navy Commander Zoe Dunning accepted the Military/Veterans Affairs Award.

Patty Stonesifer, president and chief executive of Martha’s Table, received the Philanthropy Award, and Sharon Love, co-founder of the One Love Foundation, got the Advocacy and Civic Engagement Award.

Hair Apparent

What do Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Major League Baseball player Ryan Zimmerman of the Washington Nationals have in common?

They’re both regulars at George at the Four Seasons, which celebrated its $100,000 salon renovation with an al fresco party last night.

A model with her hair shaped in a bowtie wore electric-blue eye shadow applied by Michelle Obama’s makeup artist, Carl Ray, who works at the Pennsylvania Avenue salon, where cuts start at $120.

Nearby, Debbie Dingell, the president of D2 strategies, stood in a black dress and pearls, her blond locks falling smoothly to her shoulders.

Morning Convert

“When I discovered I could get my hair done at 7 a.m., I became a convert,” she said, following in the footsteps of Pelosi, who visits the salon every morning, according to co-owner and stylist Omer Cevirme.

Dingell’s husband, Democratic Representative John Dingell of Michigan, made history last week by becoming the longest serving member of Congress.

Where does he prefer to get coiffed? “In Michigan or on Capitol Hill” at the congressional barbershop, she said.

Other salon regulars present included Deborah Sigmund, the founder of Innocents at Risk, and Susanna Quinn, the wife of lobbyist Jack Quinn.

Cevirme said he also works on Democratic senators Claire McCaskill of Missouri and Amy Klobuchar of Wisconsin, and actress Glenn Close when she’s in town.

“It’s great people watching,” said Ray. “We’re like a social scene. It’s an institution.”

His only criticism of Washington women? “Too much foundation.”

(Stephanie Green is a writer and photographer for Muse, the arts and leisure section of Bloomberg News. Any opinions expressed are her own.)

Muse highlights include Manuela Hoelterhoff on music, Philip Boroff on theater.

To contact the writer on this story: Stephanie Green in Washington at sgreen57@bloomberg.net or on Twitter @stephlgreen.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Manuela Hoelterhoff at mhoelterhoff@bloomberg.net.

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