Samsung-Backed Mobile Platform Tizen Is Set to Rise

Photographer: Woohae Cho/Bloomberg

Customers try a Samsung Electronics Co. Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet and S Pen at the Samsung d'light store in Seoul. There currently are no Tizen devices sold globally. The first users will have 1,000 applications to choose from. Close

Customers try a Samsung Electronics Co. Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet and S Pen at the... Read More

Close
Open
Photographer: Woohae Cho/Bloomberg

Customers try a Samsung Electronics Co. Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet and S Pen at the Samsung d'light store in Seoul. There currently are no Tizen devices sold globally. The first users will have 1,000 applications to choose from.

While mobile operating systems from Google and Apple rule the smartphone market today, an underdog backed by Samsung and Intel is expected to start mounting fierce competition this year.

Samsung plans to release its first phones based on the Tizen platform later this year. The Korean giant's marketing muscle should help propel the open-source software into the mainstream. And because Tizen devices are expected to be cheaper than popular models like the iPhone, they should appeal to consumers in developing markets, especially in the Asia-Pacific region.

"Asian mobile operators are very unhappy," Joshua Flood, an analyst at ABI Research, said in an interview. "They want handsets to be as cheap as possible. This is basically pushing the handset prices down."

Tizen is set to become the sixth-largest mobile operating system in the world this year, according to a report released today by ABI, a technology research firm. That still puts Tizen behind Android, iOS, Symbian, BlackBerry and Windows.

But that's just the beginning. Over the next five years, Tizen's installed base will reach 3.3 percent of all smartphone shipments, up from 0.3 percent this year, ABI estimates.

As operating systems like BlackBerry continue to bleed market share that could give Tizen just the opening it seeks to move up the rankings.

Bloomberg reserves the right to edit or remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.