DBV in Advanced Talks for U.S. Peanut Drug Partnership, CEO Says

DBV Technologies SA (DBV), a French maker of allergy treatments, is in “pretty advanced” talks for a partnership in the U.S. for its most developed product, an experimental therapy against peanut allergy.

The company, based in Bagneux, close to Paris, is in talks with three to four “very serious” potential partners and an agreement could be reached this year or next, Chief Executive Officer Pierre-Henri Benhamou said in a telephone interview yesterday. Some are based in the U.S. while others are “global players,” he said, declining to identify them.

DBV Technologies, whose products are designed to treat allergies through patches applied on the skin, said today it signed an agreement with Stallergenes SA (GENP), the maker of the Oralair hay-fever treatment, to jointly develop skin patches against respiratory allergies, a new area for DBV.

“This shows our patches are universal and can be used in all types of allergies,” Benhamou said. It’s a “tremendous” opportunity, he said.

In the coming weeks, DBV and Stallergenes will start identifying what allergens to develop together, David Schilansky, DBV’s chief financial officer, said during the interview. The companies will then enter licensing agreements for each one picked, he said.

DBV is also investing in the development of an experimental vaccine patch, according to Benhamou. It’s in talks with a “certain number” of vaccine companies for a potential licensing agreement on the product, Schilansky said.

DBV reported a net loss of 13 million euros ($17 million) last year. The company’s shares eased 2.2 percent to 8.35 euros by 4:49 p.m. in Paris, giving the company a market value of 111.9 million euros. Antony, France-based Stallergenes added 0.2 percent to 51.66 euros.

To contact the reporter on this story: Albertina Torsoli in Paris at atorsoli@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Phil Serafino at pserafino@bloomberg.net

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