Ex-Yale University Hockey Coach Tim Taylor Dies of Cancer at 71

Photographer: Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

A file photo shows Yale University hockey coach Tim Taylor during team practice at the Ingalls Rink in New Haven, Connecticut on Tuesday, January 13, 1998. Taylor coached at Yale from 1976 through 2006 and during that time also spent two years as coach of the U.S. Olympic team. Taylor died over the weekend from cancer at the age of 71. Close

A file photo shows Yale University hockey coach Tim Taylor during team practice at the... Read More

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Photographer: Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

A file photo shows Yale University hockey coach Tim Taylor during team practice at the Ingalls Rink in New Haven, Connecticut on Tuesday, January 13, 1998. Taylor coached at Yale from 1976 through 2006 and during that time also spent two years as coach of the U.S. Olympic team. Taylor died over the weekend from cancer at the age of 71.

Tim Taylor, who won a school-record 337 games and six Ivy League titles over 28 seasons as Yale University’s hockey coach, died over the weekend from cancer. He was 71.

Taylor coached at Yale from 1976 through 2006 and during that time also spent two years as coach of the U.S. Olympic team, including at the 1994 Winter Games.

“His passion for the game as a student and a teacher was intoxicating,” said former Olympian and Yale center Bob Brooke, who played seven seasons in the National Hockey League. “You couldn’t be a hockey player and not take something positive from his study and enthusiasm for the game.”

After being succeeded by former player Keith Allain as Yale’s coach, Taylor joined USA Hockey as the director of player personnel for the junior national team that won a gold medal at last year’s world championships.

“Tim was so many things to me. First a coach, then a boss and mentor and later a peer,” Allain, who led the Bulldogs to their first national championship two weeks ago, said in comments distributed by the school. “But most importantly, he was a friend. He has had a positive impact on so many people’s lives and I am fortunate to be one of them.”

Taylor had a 337-433-55 career record at Yale.

To contact the reporter on this story: Erik Matuszewski in New York at matuszewski@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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