Reggie Jackson Pulls 3-Homer World Series Game Jersey From Sale

Reggie Jackson and SCP Auctions are no longer selling a jersey the former New York Yankees’ slugger was believed to be wearing when he hit three home runs in Game 6 of the 1977 World Series.

The white pinstripe Yankees uniform was set to be auctioned online through April 27, yet SCP Auctions said that detailed analysis of video footage shows “subtle inconsistencies” between the jersey and the one he wore on the field. SCP Auctions said photographic evidence indicates that the jersey had been worn by Jackson in the clubhouse after the game.

“Since taking this jersey home from Yankee Stadium on the night of October 18, 1977, Reggie has kept this jersey for 35 years believing it to be the one he wore on the field,” the Laguna Niguel, California-based auction house said in a statement. “However, SCP Auctions and Reggie Jackson are in agreement that further research is required to positively validate this jersey as his game worn jersey from that night.”

The outfielder’s five home runs during the 1977 World Series earned him Most Valuable Player honors and the nickname “Mr. October,” which occupies the second line on his Hall of Fame plaque. With the Yankees up three games to two, Jackson hit home runs on three consecutive pitches from three different pitchers in an 8-4 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers at Yankee Stadium. He was the first player since Babe Ruth in 1928 to hit three home runs in a World Series game.

Jackson had said earlier this month that he would use the proceeds from the jersey sale to make “significant” donations to family members, as well as his Mr. October Foundation for Kids, which promotes educational endeavors in minority communities. SCP Auctions said the inconsistency was based primarily on analysis of the pinstripe alignment relative to the sewn on “NY” crest on the front of the jersey.

To contact the reporter on this story: Erik Matuszewski in New York at matuszewski@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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