Kenyon College Picks Sean Decatur as its New President

Source: Kenyon College via Bloomberg

Kenyon College, the liberal arts school in Gambier, Ohio, named Sean Decatur, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Oberlin College, as its next president, effective July 1. Close

Kenyon College, the liberal arts school in Gambier, Ohio, named Sean Decatur, dean of... Read More

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Source: Kenyon College via Bloomberg

Kenyon College, the liberal arts school in Gambier, Ohio, named Sean Decatur, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Oberlin College, as its next president, effective July 1.

Kenyon College, the liberal arts school in Gambier, Ohio, named Sean Decatur, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Oberlin College, as its next president, effective July 1.

Decatur, 44, will replace S. Georgia Nugent, a Classics scholar who is stepping down after a decade at the helm, Kenyon said today in a statement.

Decatur, who will be Kenyon’s first black president, has spent most of his career at liberal arts schools, including positions as an associate dean, department chair and professor of chemistry at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts.

“All evidence points to a liberal arts education as being a successful platform for a full range of careers and that we graduate students who think critically, who communicate well, and who can solve problems,” Decatur said in the statement.

He holds a bachelor’s degree from Swarthmore College and a doctorate in biophysical chemistry from Stanford University.

Kenyon, founded in 1824, has a student body of about 1,600. Its endowment was valued at $185 million as of June 2012, according to Commonfund and the National Association of College and University Business Officers.

To contact the reporter on this story: Janet Lorin in New York jlorin@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Lisa Wolfson at lwolfson@bloomberg.net

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