James Madison Top Scorer Will Sit Half of NCAA Game After Arrest

Rayshawn Goins, the leading scorer and rebounder for James Madison University, will sit out the first half of the Dukes’ National Collegiate Athletic Association men’s basketball tournament game tomorrow against Long Island University Brooklyn following his arrest.

Goins, a senior forward averaging 12.7 points and 7.4 rebounds per game, was arrested two days ago and charged with obstruction of justice and disorderly conduct, both misdemeanors, according to the Rockingham/Harrisonburg General District Court website. He was released on his own recognizance and has an April 8 hearing.

His arrest came the same day that matchups for the NCAA tournament were announced. Harrisonburg, Virginia-based James Madison beat Northeastern 70-57 on March 11 to win the Colonial Athletic Association conference tournament and qualify for the NCAA tournament for the first time since 1994. The Dukes face LIU Brooklyn in a play-in game in Dayton, Ohio, with the winner taking on No. 1 seed Indiana on March 22.

Don Egle, a spokesman for the school, said yesterday in an e-mail that he did not have any information about Goins’s attorney, and none was listed on the court website.

Coach Matt Brady made the decision to sit Goins “in accordance with JMU athletic policy,” the school said in an e- mailed statement.

“After having thoroughly reviewed the details in this case, the athletic administration supports coach Brady’s decision,” the school said in the statement.

Speaking at a media luncheon yesterday, Brady said the team has played many minutes without Goins this season.

“I’m not sure that it wouldn’t necessarily be the best team, some times in this next game, to have him on the bench, trying to get back in the game, saying, ‘Coach, when am I going back in?’” Brady said before the punishment was announced.

To contact the reporter on this story: Mason Levinson in New York at mlevinson@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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