Mursi to Address Egyptians After Three Killed in Protests

Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi is to address the nation, as three people were killed in renewed protests following a mass funeral of more than two dozen others during earlier demonstrations.

Thousands of Egyptians poured into the streets of Port Said, with some marchers carrying open coffins and calling for revenge after violence triggered by a court ruling yesterday. The three killed today died from gunshot wounds, Dr. Abdel- Rahman Farag, head of Port Said hospitals, said by phone. State television said Mursi would speak tonight.

Protesters burned two clubs belonging to the police and military, and security forces fired tear gas, the state-run Ahram Gate reported, while clashes between protesters and security forces left more than 400 injured, the doctor said.

The country has witnessed 48 hours of violence since Jan. 25, the second anniversary of the uprising that overthrew Hosni Mubarak. Yesterday, at least 32 people died after a court issued 21 death sentences over last year’s stadium melee, the worst soccer-related violence the country has known. The unrest has fueled criticism of Mursi by opponents who say he has already reneged on campaign promises and has put the interests of his allies in the Muslim Brotherhood ahead of the nation’s.

The military issued a statement on its Facebook page reaffirming the right to peaceful protest while urging citizens of Port Said and Suez -- cities where violence was concentrated over the past two days -- to restrain themselves and ensure their protests did not harm state installations.

“The nation is in desperate need of the unity of its sons,” state-run Ahram Gate reported, citing a military statement issued today. The military warned it was prepared to tackle “with all firmness” any efforts threatening stability and security.

To contact the reporter on this story: Tarek El-Tablawy in Cairo at teltablawy@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Andrew J. Barden at barden@bloomberg.net

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