Jets Hire Seahawks’ John Idzik as General Manager, NFL Team Says

The New York Jets hired John Idzik as the National Football League team’s general manager, succeeding the fired Mike Tannenbaum.

The Jets also are adding Philadelphia Eagles offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg to replace Tony Sparano, who was fired from that job after one season, ESPN reported, citing unidentified people familiar with the transaction.

Idzik had been the Seattle Seahawks’ vice president of football operations for the past six seasons. Seattle made the playoffs this season.

“John has seen first-hand what’s necessary to construct a winning team and has worked with some of the most innovative and successful coaches in the NFL,” Jets owner Woody Johnson said in a statement.

The Jets finished with a 6-10 record and missed the playoffs for the second season in row. The 43-year-old Tannenbaum had been the team’s general manager since 2006 after working as assistant GM beginning in 2001.

Idzik’s father, John, held numerous coaching positions in the NFL, including serving as offensive coordinator with the Jets from 1977-79.

Before joining the Seahawks, who were eliminated from the playoffs on Jan. 13 with a 30-28 loss to the Atlanta Falcons, Idzik spent three seasons as senior director of football operations with the Arizona Cardinals. He broke into the NFL in 1993 and spent 11 seasons with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, winning a Super Bowl in 2001 as the team’s assistant general manager.

New York reached the playoffs three times and never won a division title in Tannenbaum’s seven years overseeing personnel. Their regular-season record was 57-55 during that span.

The team retained Rex Ryan as its coach for 2013 and fired Sparano.

“Drawing on 20 years of NFL experience, John, working with Rex, will get the Jets where all of us want to be,” Johnson said.

To contact the reporter on this story: Michael Buteau in Atlanta at mbuteau@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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