Ex-Massachusetts Treasurer’s Campaign Manager Not Guilty

Scott Campbell, the former campaign manager of ex-Massachusetts Treasurer Timothy Cahill, was found not guilty of conspiracy and procurement fraud in a campaign funds case.

The jury of seven women and five men are scheduled to return to state court in Boston tomorrow to continue deliberating in the case against Cahill, who is accused of fraudulently using state lottery advertising funds to promote his unsuccessful run for governor in 2010.

Deliberations began Dec. 4. The jury asked Suffolk Superior Court Judge Christine Roach two questions today, which weren’t made public. Roach instructed lawyers not to discuss the questions with reporters and jurors were told not to watch or read local news.

Cahill, 54, is charged with two counts of conspiracy and one count each of procurement fraud and using his office for unwarranted privileges for planning to use $1.5 million of public money to benefit his candidacy.

“We’re very happy,” Campbell said outside the courtroom after the verdict. “We’re very relieved.”

The two men sat at opposite ends of the defense table during the trial and rarely interacted. Campbell became Cahill’s campaign manager after his original manager, Adam Meldrum, left the campaign.

“I’m happy for Scott,” Cahill said as he left court today.

Cahill, as state treasurer, gave the go-ahead to use 75 percent of the lottery’s advertising budget for TV and radio ads that promoted his independent campaign, Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley said in April.

Cahill lost the race to incumbent Democrat Deval Patrick.

Alfred Grazioso, the former chief of staff of the lottery, is awaiting trial on charges of obstructing justice during the attorney general’s probe.

This was the first time criminal charges were brought under state ethics laws that were made tougher in 2009.

To contact the reporters on this story: Don Jeffrey in New York at djeffrey1@bloomberg.net; Janelle Lawrence in Boston at jmlawrence@me.com

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Hytha at mhytha@bloomberg.net

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