ESPN Reaches 12-Year College Football Agreement With Orange Bowl

ESPN reached a 12-year agreement to televise college football’s Orange Bowl, one day after announcing a similar broadcast deal with the Sugar Bowl.

ESPN and the Atlantic Coast Conference didn’t disclose financial terms of the agreement in separate news releases. ESPN.com reported that the Walt Disney Co. network will pay $55 million annually for the Miami bowl game, which will match the ACC champion against an opponent from the Big Ten or Southeastern conferences, or the University of Notre Dame.

ESPN’s extended agreement with the Orange Bowl starts after the 2014 season, when college football’s new four-team playoff system also begins. The Orange Bowl, played on New Year’s Eve or Jan. 1, is one of six games that will serve as rotating hosts for the national semifinals.

“The Orange Bowl has a great history and we are very proud to be part of extending that into the next decade,” ESPN President John Skipper said in a statement.

ESPN announced yesterday that it reached a 12-year agreement for the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans, which features the Southeastern Conference and Big 12 champions. In June, ESPN completed a 12-year deal with the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, which features the champions from the Big Ten and Pacific-12.

Both agreements begin in January 2015 and run through 2026, with ESPN.com reporting the network will pay $80 million annually for the broadcast rights to each game.

The Sugar Bowl and Rose Bowl will also be among semifinal hosts in the new playoff system, with the other three games yet to be determined. The leading candidates are the Fiesta Bowl in Glendale, Arizona, the Cotton Bowl in Arlington, Texas, and the Chick-fil-A Bowl in Atlanta, ESPN has said. The location for the sport’s national championship game will be up for bid each year, similar to the process for the National Football League’s Super Bowl.

To contact the reporter on this story: Erik Matuszewski in New York at matuszewski@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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