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Madison Square Garden to Host NCAA Regionals in 2014, 2015

Madison Square Garden will host the 2014 East Regional of the National Collegiate Athletic Association men’s basketball tournament, the event’s first appearance in the New York venue in 53 years.

The arena, two-third of the way through a $1 billion renovation, was one of 25 preliminary round sites picked for the 2014 and 2015 tournament, which decides the national champion.

“The bid process was as competitive as ever,” Dan Gavitt, NCAA vice president of men’s basketball, said in a press release. “We are excited about the tournament returning to the world’s most famous arena.”

Madison Square Garden hosted 71 tournament games between 1943 and 1961. Only three arenas have hosted more tournament games, the NCAA said.

New York is one of three states chosen to host games in three different cities in 2014 and 2015. Buffalo will be the site of second- and third-round games for a fifth time in 2014, while Syracuse, a 10-time host, will be the site of the 2015 East Regional.

In Ohio, Dayton, Columbus and Cleveland will each host games. The tournament will start at the University of Dayton in 2014 and 2015, as it has done since 2001. Columbus will serve as a second- and third-round site in 2015, while Cleveland will host the Midwest Regional that year.

California will also host games in three cities. Second- and third-round contests will be played in San Diego in 2014, while Anaheim will host the West Regional the same year. Los Angeles, site of the 2013 West Regional, will assume the same roll two years later.

North Carolina, Florida and Texas each had two cities selected to host preliminary round games, while Indianapolis, home of the NCAA, will host the 2014 Midwest Regional in advance of the 2015 Final Four.

To contact the reporter on this story: Mike Buteau in Atlanta at mbuteau@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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