Sun and Higher Temperatures May Return to Northeast This Weekend

The nor’easter that dumped 4 to 8 inches (10 to 20 centimeters) of snow from New Jersey to Massachusetts is leaving the area and will be replaced by warm and dry weather this weekend.

Temperatures may reach the low 60s Fahrenheit (about 16 Celsius) starting next week, which will help melt yesterday’s snow and ice, said Lauren Nash, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Upton, New York.

“The snow is ending here from west to east; it has already ended over New Jersey” and New York City, Nash said by telephone. “The good news is after that, we are expecting dry weather through Monday. It is going to warm up.”

The storm crossed the area devastated by Hurricane Sandy last week, adding to power outages and tying up transportation. At least 1,612 flights were canceled yesterday and today 578 more have been scrubbed at U.S. airports, according to Flight Aware, an airline tracking company in Houston.

Newark had the most flights canceled yesterday and today, followed by LaGuardia and John F. Kennedy airports in New York.

The storm added at least 22,156 more customers to power outage rolls as of yesterday, pushing the total to 672,572, according to a U.S. Energy Department report.

An area from New Jersey to Boston’s suburbs received from 4 to 8 inches of snow, with some locations getting up to a foot, said Tom Kines, a meteorologist with AccuWeather Inc. in State College, Pennsylvania.

Quick Melt

Because the ground hasn’t frozen in the Northeast yet, the snow won’t last long once temperatures rise, he said.

“Not only will it melt from above but underneath,” Kines said. “It will certainly take a big hit today and especially tomorrow when you get up into the 50s. It will disappear quickly.”

Warmer weather will begin in the Washington and Philadelphia areas and then move north through the course of the weekend, Kines said.

In Central Park, the high today is expected to reach 48 today, 60 on Nov. 10 and 67 by Nov. 12, according to the National Weather Service.

The normal high for this time of year is 58, Nash said.

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at bsullivan10@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Dan Stets at dstets@bloomberg.net

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