Man. United Must Pay $58 Million for Rodriguez: Soccer Roundup

The following is a roundup of soccer stories from U.K. newspapers, with clickable Internet links.

Rodriguez Fee

Manchester United must pay 36 million pounds ($58 million) if it wants to sign Porto’s James Rodriguez in January after the Colombian winger’s renegotiated contract increased his transfer valuation, the Daily Mail reported.

When United last inquired about Rodriguez’s price, the Red Devils were told they would have to pay 24 million pounds to buy him out of his contract, the Mail said. United may try to use Nani in a part-exchange proposal or sell the Portugal winger to finance a move for Rodriguez, the Mail added.

Adkins Fears Axe

Southampton manager Nigel Adkins is said to be fearful that he will lose his job before the Nov. 10 Premier League game against Swansea City, the Guardian reported.

Nicola Cortese, the club’s executive chairman, is considering his options though will only remove Adkins if a replacement can be secured quickly, the newspaper added.

Tottenham Target

Schalke striker Klaas-Jan Huntelaar is wanted by Tottenham Hotspur and may be available for a fee of 7 million pounds, the Independent reported.

Huntelaar, 29, is out of contract at the end of the season and has yet to sign a new deal, meaning he would be free in January to sign a pre-contract agreement to join a club outside Germany for the 2013-14 season, the newspaper added.

Chamakh’s Choice

Arsenal striker Marouane Chamakh may push for a return to former club Bordeaux in January because his opportunities have been limited with the Gunners, the Daily Mirror reported.

“After Robin van Persie left, I thought I’d play more,” the Mirror cited Chamakh as saying. “But in two or three months, if nothing changes, I must make a decision.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Dan Baynes in Sydney at dbaynes@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Christopher Elser at celser@bloomberg.net

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