Third Armstrong Former Teammate Loses Job on Doping File

Australia’s Matt White became the third former colleague of Lance Armstrong to lose his job in five days following the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency’s report into doping in cycling.

White, 38, was fired as coordinator of Australia’s men’s road cycling national teams today. He had stood down from the role and as sports director of the Orica-GreenEDGE team on Oct. 13 after admitting doping on the U.S. Postal Service team from 2001 to 2003.

Sydney-based Cycling Australia, which appointed White in January 2011, said in a statement his position with the organization was “untenable.”

White follows U.S. cyclist Levi Leipheimer and RadioShack Nissan Trek general manager Johan Bruyneel in being ousted since USADA released a 202-page report and more than 1,000 pages of testimony on Oct. 10 that said seven-time Tour de France winner Armstrong used banned substances and administered them to other riders on the U.S. Postal team.

White, who also is facing an investigation by the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, said he accepted Cycling Australia’s decision.

“I understand the current situation makes it difficult to sustain the position,” White said in an e-mailed statement issued by Cycling Australia. “It’s crucial there is a positive outcome from the current debate about cycling’s past and I feel a responsibility to be part of that -- even if it won’t be in an official Cycling Australia role.”

Doctor Referral

GreenEDGE, an Australian professional road cycling team, hasn’t said if it will take any action against White. The Australian had been fired by the Garmin team in January 2011 after referring a rider to former US Postal doctor Luis Garcia del Moral in Valencia, Spain.

Leipheimer was fired by the Omega Pharma Quick-Step team yesterday after admitted doping in an affidavit published by USADA. Bruyneel denies USADA evidence of wrongdoing. He said he had agreed to leave the RadioShack team to concentrate on his defense in an arbitration hearing.

Armstrong’s lawyer Timothy Herman said Oct. 10 that USADA’s report is “a taxpayer-funded tabloid piece rehashing old, disproved, unreliable allegations based largely on axe-grinders, serial perjurers, coerced testimony, sweetheart deals and threat-induced stories.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Dan Baynes in Sydney at dbaynes@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Christopher Elser at celser@bloomberg.net

Press spacebar to pause and continue. Press esc to stop.

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.