Obama-Romney Tie Among Likely Voters in Gallup Tracking

Two measures today suggest a settling of the boost that Republican Mitt Romney found in opinion polls following his performance in debate against President Barack Obama one week ago.

Gallup’s daily tracking, the rolling average of seven days of surveys, shows a stall in Romney’s gains by two measurements.

The daily tracking of likely voters conducted Oct. 3 through Oct. 9, starting with the day of the first presidential debate in Denver, shows the contest tied at 48 percent support for each candidate. Romney led, by 49 percent to 47 percent, in Gallup’s first survey of likely voters released yesterday.

The survey’s count of registered voters today reports Obama ahead of Romney, by 50 percent to 45 percent, up from a 49 percent to 46 percent edge yesterday.

“It certainly seems as if the initial boost Romney received is less evident in the last several days of interviewing,” said Frank Newport, Gallup editor-in-chief.

The president’s job approval also has gained a notch, to 53 percent, in Gallup’s tracking of registered votes.

The Oct. 3 debate, in which Romney fared better than Obama according to voters surveyed by CNN, Gallup and the Pew Research Center, wasn’t the sole event with a potential impact on public opinion last week. The nation’s unemployment rate slid to 7.8 percent in September, the Department of Labor reported on Oct. 5, the first time it fell below 8 percent in 44 months and its lowest level since Obama took office in January 2009.

Gallup said that within the seven-day tracking, its daily polling Oct. 7 and Oct. 8 showed Obama ahead, by 50 percent to 45 percent, among registered voters, the same as during the pre- debate period of Sept. 30-Oct. 2. The two were tied at 47 percent among registered voters during the immediate post-debate period, Oct. 4-6.

The gains for the president reported today are within the margin of error, plus or minus 2 percentage points, for Gallup’s survey of 3,050 voters conducted over seven days.

To contact the reporter on this story: Jonathan D. Salant in Washington at jsalant@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Jeanne Cummings at jcummings21@bloomberg.net

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.