Columbia Journalism’s Dean Lemann to Step Down After Decade

Photographer: Joe Kohen/Getty Images

Nicholas Lemann, dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Close

Nicholas Lemann, dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

Close
Open
Photographer: Joe Kohen/Getty Images

Nicholas Lemann, dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

Nicholas Lemann, a longtime contributor to the New Yorker magazine, will step down as dean of Columbia University’s Journalism School after a decade in the post.

Lemann will leave in June 2013 at the end of the academic year, the New York-based school said today in a statement. President Lee Bollinger will lead the search for a successor.

The 10-year term was “the happiest season of my career,” Lemann said in the statement. “Together we have accomplished a lot, for the school and for our profession.”

Under Lemann’s stewardship, the New York-based school added 20 members to its full-time faculty; built a student center; completed its first capital fundraising campaign; and created new initiatives in investigative reporting, digital journalism and executive leadership for news organizations, according to the school’s website.

“The many tangible benefits of Nick’s transformative leadership are felt today not only by students attending the Journalism School but also by the profession and the society more generally,” Bollinger said in the statement.

Alongside the Master of Science program that teaches the basics of reporting, Lemann inaugurated the school’s Master of Arts journalism program to give experienced journalists a year of study across the university in four specific areas: arts and culture, health and science, business and economics, or politics.

Under Lemann, the Columbia Journalism Review, which the school publishes, began a daily online edition, as well as publishing six times a year in print.

Tuition Costs

The cost to attend the journalism school’s 10-month Master of Science program is an estimated $81,222, including tuition, room and board and living expenses.

Helen Gurley Brown, the late editor of Cosmopolitan magazine, gave the school $18 million in January to fund fellowships, endow a professorship and create a modern newsroom on campus. It was the largest gift in the journalism school’s history. Brown died in August at the age of 90.

Lemann has published books including “Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War”; “The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy”; and “The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America.”

The journalism school was founded by Joseph Pulitzer in 1912. Columbia University administers the Pulitzer Prizes for journalism, literature and musical composition.

Alumni of the journalism school include Joseph Lelyveld, former executive editor of the New York Times; Steve Kroft of CBS News; and author Erik Larson, who wrote “The Devil in the White City.”

To contact the reporters on this story: Peter S. Green in New York at psgreen@bloomberg.net; John Lauerman in Boston at jlauerman@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Jonathan Kaufman at jkaufman17@bloomberg.net

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.