Coffee Slides Most in 10 Weeks on Supplies: Commodities at Close

The Standard & Poor’s GSCI Spot Index of 24 raw materials fell 0.8 percent to 659.63. Coffee spurred the decline.

The UBS Bloomberg CMCI gauge of 26 prices fell 0.6 percent to 1,622.3926.

SOFT COMMODITIES

Coffee futures fell the most in 10 weeks on prospects for increasing global supplies.

Arabica coffee for December delivery tumbled 4 percent to settle at $1.681 a pound on ICE Futures U.S., the biggest drop for a most-active contract since July 24.

Cotton for December delivery declined 0.8 percent to 71.49 cents a pound on ICE.

Raw sugar for March delivery decreased 0.3 percent to close at 21.54 cents a pound.

Cocoa futures for December delivery slid 0.5 percent to $2,382 a ton in New York.

Orange-juice futures for November delivery fell 0.3 percent to $1.151 a pound.

CRUDE OIL

Oil capped a third weekly drop as signals that supply is exceeding demand outweighed an unexpected decline in the unemployment rate.

Crude oil for November delivery fell $1.83, or 2 percent, to settle at $89.88 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

Brent oil for November settlement slipped 56 cents, or 0.5 percent, to end the session at $112.02 a barrel on the London- based ICE Futures Europe exchange.

The European benchmark grade was at a premium of $22.14 to New York-traded West Texas Intermediate, the widest differential since Oct. 21, 2011. The spread was up from $20.87 yesterday.

OIL PRODUCTS

Gasoline rose as refinery and pipeline shutdowns threatened supply levels and as the U.S. unemployment rate slipped to 7.8 percent in September, the lowest level since President Barack Obama took office in January 2009.

Gasoline for November delivery rose 0.96 cent, or 0.3 percent, to settle at $2.9525 a gallon on the Nymex.

November-delivery heating oil fell 3.25 cents, or 1 percent, to settle at $3.1559 a gallon on the Nymex.

Regular gasoline at the pump, averaged nationwide, rose 0.5 cent to $3.789 a gallon yesterday, AAA data show.

NATURAL GAS

Natural gas futures declined for the second time in three days as inventories of the fuel headed toward an end-of-season record.

Natural gas for November delivery fell 1 cent to settle at $3.396 per million British thermal units on the Nymex.

GRAINS, OILSEEDS

Corn futures fell the most in a week on signs of slowing demand for supplies from the U.S., the world’s biggest exporter.

Corn futures for December delivery slid 1.2 percent to close at $7.48 a bushel on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Soybean futures for November delivery settled unchanged at $15.515 a bushel in Chicago.

Wheat futures for December delivery fell 1.4 percent to settle at $8.575 a bushel on the CBOT.

PRECIOUS METALS

Gold futures fell from the highest level in almost 11 months after the U.S. unemployment rate unexpectedly dropped, easing pressure on the Federal Reserve to expand monetary stimulus.

Gold futures for December delivery fell 0.9 percent to settle at $1,780.80 on the Comex in New York.

Silver futures for December delivery declined 1.5 percent to $34.572 an ounce.

Platinum futures for January delivery retreated 1 percent to $1,707.20 an ounce on the Nymex.

Palladium futures for December delivery slumped 1.7 percent to $663.20 an ounce on the Nymex.

BASE METALS

Copper futures fell for the second time in three days as commodities tumbled, spurred by slumping energy prices.

Copper futures for December delivery declined 0.2 percent to settle at $3.778 a pound on the Comex.

On the London Metal Exchange, copper for delivery in three months fell 0.1 percent to $8,295 a metric ton ($3.76 a pound). Tin, lead, nickel and aluminum dropped, while zinc rose.

LIVESTOCK

Hog futures climbed for the fourth time this week on signs that U.S. demand for pork is increasing.

Hog futures for December settlement climbed 0.7 percent to close at 76.55 cents a pound on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.

Cattle futures for December delivery rose 0.4 percent to settle at $1.262 a pound in Chicago.

To contact the reporter on this story: Dan Murtaugh in Houston at dmurtaugh@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dan Stets at dstets@bloomberg.net

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