Gasoline, Crude Oil Lead Commodity Gains: Commodities at Close

The Standard & Poor’s GSCI Spot Index of 24 raw materials jumped 2.5 percent to 665.19, the biggest increase in two months. Gasoline and crude oil led the advance.

The UBS Bloomberg CMCI gauge of 26 prices rose 1.1 percent to 1,631.978.

OIL PRODUCTS

Gasoline surged 5.1 percent as refinery and pipeline shutdowns increased concern that supplies aren’t adequate to meet demand.

Gasoline for November delivery rose 14.34 cents to settle at $2.9429 a gallon on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It was the first increase this week.

November-delivery heating oil advanced 12.2 cents, or 4 percent, to $3.1884 a gallon, the highest settlement for the front-month contract since Sept. 14.

CRUDE OIL

Oil climbed the most in two months as the euro rose against the dollar and tension between Syria and Turkey fanned concern that Middle East output will be disrupted.

Crude oil for November delivery climbed 4.1 percent to settle at $91.71 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange, the biggest increase since Aug. 3.

NATURAL GAS

Natural gas advanced for the seventh time in eight days as an expected blast of cold air signaled stronger demand for heating fuel.

Natural gas for November delivery gained 1.1 cents to settle at $3.406 per million British thermal units on the Nymex after rising as high as $3.464.

SOFT COMMODITIES

Coffee fell the most in two weeks as weather concern eased in Brazil, the world’s biggest producer, and U.S. inventories climbed. Cocoa, cotton and orange also slid. Sugar gained.

Arabica-coffee futures for December delivery fell 3.3 percent to settle at $1.7505 a pound on ICE Futures U.S. in New York, the biggest decline for an active contract since Sept. 15.

Cocoa futures for December delivery fell 0.9 percent to $2,395 a metric ton on ICE.

Cotton futures for December delivery slipped 0.1 percent to 72.09 cents a pound, snapping a three-day rally.

Orange-juice futures for November delivery dropped 0.4 percent to $1.155 a pound.

Raw-sugar futures for March delivery rose 0.1 percent to 21.6 cents a pound, after touching 21.77 cents, the highest since Aug. 7.

GRAINS, OILSEEDS

Soybeans rose the most this week on signs of increased demand for supplies from the U.S., the world’s biggest exporter. Corn also advanced, while wheat declined.

Soybeans for November delivery jumped 1.3 percent to close at $15.515 a bushel on the Chicago Board of Trade, the biggest gain since Sept. 28.

Corn for December delivery rose 0.25 cent to $7.57 a bushel on the CBOT.

Wheat for December delivery fell 0.4 percent to $8.6925 a bushel in Chicago, the third decline this week.

PRECIOUS METALS

Gold jumped to the highest level in almost 11 months as the European Central Bank said it is ready to start buying government bonds, boosting demand for the metal as a store of value. Silver, platinum and palladium also gained.

Gold for December delivery climbed 0.9 percent to settle at $1,796.50 an ounce on the Comex in New York. Earlier, the price reached $1,797.70, the highest for a most-active contract since Nov. 9.

Silver for December delivery advanced 1.2 percent to $35.101 an ounce on the Comex, the highest settlement since March 1.

Platinum futures for January delivery rose 1.8 percent to $1,725.10 an ounce on the New York Mercantile Exchange, the highest settlement since Sept. 21, 2011.

Palladium futures for December delivery rose 2.6 percent to $674.75 an ounce, the biggest gain since Sept. 10.

BASE METALS

Copper advanced for the fifth time in six sessions as European policy makers held borrowing costs at record lows, bolstering prospects for metal demand.

Copper for December delivery rose 0.1 percent to settle at $3.786 a pound at 1:23 p.m. on the Comex in New York.

On the London Metal Exchange, copper for delivery in three months climbed 0.1 percent to $8,300 a metric ton ($3.76 a pound).

Aluminum, nickel, tin rose, while lead and zinc fell.

LIVESTOCK

Hog futures rose in Chicago on signs that U.S. demand for pork is climbing. Cattle fell.

Hogs for December settlement climbed 0.2 percent to close at 76.05 cents a pound on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Prices are down 9.8 percent this year.

Cattle futures for December delivery fell 0.3 percent to settle at $1.257 a pound in Chicago. The commodity has climbed 3.5 percent this year.

Feeder-cattle futures for November settlement dropped 0.7 percent to $1.45825 a pound on the CME.

To contact the reporter on this story: Barbara J. Powell in Dallas at bpowell4@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dan Stets at dstets@bloomberg.net

Press spacebar to pause and continue. Press esc to stop.

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.