Breaking News

U.S. May S&P/Case-Shiller Home Prices Rise 9.3% vs. Year Ago
Tweet TWEET

Sri Lanka Wins Twenty20 Tiebreaker as West Indies Beat England

Host Sri Lanka beat New Zealand in a super over tiebreaker and West Indies defeated defending champion England by 15 runs to open the last-eight phase of cricket’s World Twenty20 competition.

The super over was used in yesterday’s first Super Eight match in Pallekele after the scores were tied on 174 when Lahiru Thirimanne was run out on the last ball. Sri Lanka made 13-1 in the one-over eliminator and kept New Zealand down to 8.

“It’s nice to have a win under your belt so the pressure eases down,” Sri Lanka captain Mahela Jayawardene said at the post-match presentation. “We thought we had won but it needed a super over.”

West Indies tops Group 1 ahead of tournament favorite Sri Lanka because of a superior net run rate after England made 164-4 in its chase of the Caribbean team’s 179-5.

There are two groups of four in the Super Eight, with the top two in each advancing to the semifinals. Pakistan plays South Africa and Australia meets India in today’s Group 2 doubleheader in Colombo.

Rob Nicol top scored for New Zealand with 58 yesterday after captain Ross Taylor won the toss. Martin Guptill made 38, Brendon McCullum 25 and Taylor 23.

Bowler Akila Dananjaya had medical treatment after a drive by Nicol went through his attempted catch and hit him in the face. Soon after, McCullum was out and Nicol stepped up the pace, scoring three sixes in an over, before being caught off Dananjaya. New Zealand ended on 174-7.

Run Out

Tillakaratne Dilshan scored 76 and Jayawardene 44 in Sri Lanka’s 174-6. The home team needed eight off the final over to win. Thirimanne scooped a four off the second-to-last delivery before getting run out next ball to leave the scores tied. His dismissal followed a lengthy video review after Taylor, at the stumps, fumbled the ball from James Franklin’s throw.

Tim Southee bowled two wides while allowing 13 runs in the tiebreaker and Lasith Malinga restricted New Zealand to 8. Dilshan caught Guptill on the boundary off the next-to-last ball of the extra over as the batsman attempted a six.

“To lose tight matches is always disappointing,” Taylor said. “But from the situation we were in, I thought we fought back very hard and never gave up. I am proud of my team.”

Windies Win

Also in Pallekele, man of the match Johnson Charles scored 84 and fellow opener Chris Gayle slammed 58 off 35 balls after West Indies won the toss last night.

West Indies had sprinted to 103 when Gayle was caught by Steven Finn just after the Englishman dropped Charles. England’s bowlers continued to be ineffective and the Windies ended on 179-5. Graeme Swann allowed 32 runs off three overs, and Jade Dernbach and Samit Patel each conceded 38 off four.

“We backed ourselves to set a target and Chris and Charles got us going well,” West Indies captain Darren Sammy said at the post-match presentation. “It’s good to see the way Johnson Charles played, he stared off slow but he constructed an important innings.”

England lost two wickets without scoring in the first three balls as Ravi Rampaul dismissed Craig Kieswetter and Luke Wright. Kieron Pollard then took a high catch on the boundary to dismiss Jonny Bairstow for 18 and leave England at 55-3.

Eoin Morgan joined opener Alex Hales in the middle and the pair added 107 for the fourth wicket. Hales was dismissed for 68 in the third-last delivery as England chased 23 off the last over to reach the victory target. Morgan scored five sixes in his 36-ball 71 not out.

“It was always going to be tough chasing down that total after being none for two,” Hales said on the tournament’s website. “We fought back very well to give ourselves half a chance towards the end.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Peter-Joseph Hegarty in London at phegarty@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Christopher Elser at celser@bloomberg.net

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.