Leslie May Not Gain Hurricane Power Nearing Newfoundland

Tropical Storm Leslie probably won’t regain hurricane strength before it passes over the eastern end of Newfoundland sometime tomorrow.

Tropical storm and hurricane watches have been issued in Newfoundland for Leslie, which may begin to lose its tropical characteristics as early as today, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center. The storm’s large size and lack of an inner core limit its chances of growing stronger.

“Leslie has really struggled to intensify and it looks like it’s not going to be a big concern at this point,” said Matt Rogers, president of Commodity Weather Group LLC in Bethesda, Maryland.

Hurricane Igor raked Newfoundland in September 2010, washing out roads, isolating cities and towns and killing at least one person there.

Leslie, the 12th named storm of the 2012 Atlantic season, was 650 miles (1,046 kilometers) south-southwest of Cape Race, Newfoundland, as of 2 p.m. East Coast time with top winds of 60 miles per hour. The system was moving north-northeast at 25 mph, the center said.

A hurricane watch is in effect from Stones Cove to Charlottetown, Newfoundland. A tropical storm watch is up from Indian Harbour to Triton.

Tropical storm-force winds, those of at least 39 mph, extend outward as much as 205 miles from the core of the storm, the center said.

Big Storm

Rogers said Leslie’s forward speed will increase through the day, and the system will become just another “big Northeast storm” as it loses tropical characteristics.

“I am not excited about it at this point, it’s not a repeat of that one in 2010,” Rogers said.

Leslie’s track after Newfoundland may take the system near southern Greenland in two days, the NHC’s forecast map showed.

Hurricane Michael was about 1,120 miles west of the Azores packing 80 mph winds and moving west at 8 mph, the NHC said in a separate advisory. The system is forecast to weaken to a tropical storm and is no threat to land.

In addition, there is a budding storm about 855 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands that has a 90 percent chance of becoming a tropical system in the next two days. Rogers said computer models show that storm will probably stay out to sea without threatening land.

To contact the reporters on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at bsullivan10@bloomberg.net; Winnie Zhu in Singapore at wzhu4@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dan Stets in New York at dstets@bloomberg.net.

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