Knicks Sign Ex-Bulls Guard Brewer With Shumpert Out, Agent Says

The New York Knicks will sign former Chicago Bulls guard Ronnie Brewer, his agent said.

Brewer, 27, will get the veteran’s minimum of $1.4 million, ESPN said, and will probably see much of the playing time slated for Iman Shumpert, who is out with a knee injury and may not return until January. Knicks spokesman Jonathan Supranowitz said in an e-mail he couldn’t confirm the signing.

Brewer’s agent, Henry Thomas, said in an e-mail that joining the Knicks gives Brewer an “opportunity to start and have a significant role on a very good playoff team.” He wouldn’t disclose terms.

New York Knicks lets get it!!!” Brewer wrote on his Twitter page after thanking the Bulls’ fans and players. “The organization was great and everyone I’ve come across as well. On to the next chapter.”

The 6-foot-7 Brewer can play shooting guard or small forward and has averaged 9.0 points, 3.0 rebounds and 1.4 steals for the Bulls, Memphis Grizzlies and Utah Jazz. While he’s made only 24 percent of his shots from three-point range during his seven-year career, he’s ranked among the NBA’s top 10 players in steal percentage four of the past five years.

Brewer can defend bigger guards as well as small forwards and is the latest addition for the Knicks, who have acquired point guards Raymond Felton and Jason Kidd this offseason while losing Jeremy Lin and Landry Fields. New York also re-signed J.R. Smith, who will probably share time with Brewer at the shooting guard position.

The Knicks today announced the signing of 35-year-old free agent guard Pablo Prigioni, a veteran of the Argentine and Spanish professional leagues who will play for Argentina at the 2012 London Olympics.

To contact the reporter on this story: Erik Matuszewski in New York at matuszewski@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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