Ex-Penn State President Spanier Drops Lawsuit Against School

Ex-Pennsylvania State University President Graham Spanier dropped his lawsuit against the school over access to e-mails, according to a court filing.

Spanier, who was fired in November, sued Penn State in May over the school’s refusal to grant him access to e-mails from 1998 through 2004 that he claims were relevant to an internal probe into sex abuse allegations against former coach Jerry Sandusky.

Lawyers for Spanier today asked a court clerk to mark the case “discontinued and ended without prejudice,” according to papers filed in state court in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania.

Sandusky, 68, a former Penn State assistant football coach, was convicted last month on 45 criminal counts tied to abuse of boys over a 15-year period. A special investigation by Louis Freeh, the former Federal Bureau of Investigation director, concluded that Spanier, former head coach Joe Paterno and other senior school officials covered up critical facts surrounding Sandusky’s abuse.

Spanier’s lawyers denied the claims in a statement last week. The former president was never told of any incident involving Sandusky that described child abuse or sexual misconduct in his 16 years on the job, according to the statement. Spanier hasn’t been charged with any wrongdoing.

His attorneys, Peter Vaira and John Riley, didn’t immediately return a phone call seeking comment on the dropped complaint. A hearing scheduled for Aug. 17 in the case was canceled, according to a notice on the court’s website.

The case is Spanier v. The Pennsylvania State University, 2012-2065, Court of Common Pleas of Centre County Pennsylvania (Bellefonte).

To contact the reporter on this story: Sophia Pearson in Philadelphia at spearson3@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Hytha at mhytha@bloomberg.net

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