Knicks’ Jason Kidd Charged With DWI After Car Crash in Hamptons

Jason Kidd was charged with driving while intoxicated following a single-car accident in the Hamptons yesterday, the latest offseason twist in the point guard situation for the New York Knicks.

Kidd, 39, joined the Knicks this month after five National Basketball Association seasons with the Dallas Mavericks.

The Knicks have until tomorrow to decide whether they’ll match the three-year, $25 million offer sheet Jeremy Lin received from the Houston Rockets. They’re also close to completing a sign-and-trade agreement with the Portland Trail Blazers to acquire free agent point guard Raymond Felton, Sports Illustrated reported, citing Felton’s agent Tony Dutt.

Kidd’s 2010 Cadillac Escalade struck a telephone pole and then went into the woods at 1:56 a.m. yesterday morning, the Southampton Town Police Department said in a news release.

Kidd’s attorney Edward Burke Jr. said in a statement that Kidd suffered minor injuries and has pleaded not guilty. The Knicks didn’t immediately comment on the incident and the NBA said it was monitoring the situation.

Kidd was the only occupant of the vehicle and the crash occurred near the intersection of Cobb Road and Little Cobb Road in the hamlet of Water Mill, according to police.

After being released from the hospital, Kidd was taken to police headquarters, where he was held until his arraignment in the morning before being released on his own recognizance, Southampton police said.

Kidd had attended a benefit honoring movie director George Lucas at a private residence in East Hampton on the night of July 14, New York Newsday reported. Burke said Kidd had been attending a charity event, without disclosing details.

Kidd has 11,842 career assists, second in NBA history to Hall of Fame point guard John Stockton. He’s averaged 13 points, nine assists and 6.4 rebounds over 18 NBA seasons.

To contact the reporter on this story: Erik Matuszewski in New York at matuszewski@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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