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U.S. Sprinter Dunn Pulls Out of Olympics After Failed Drug Test

Sprinter Debbie Dunn withdrew from the U.S. Olympic team after failing a drug test during the selection trials last month.

Dunn, who finished fourth in the 400 meters at the trials on June 24 in Eugene, Oregon, said in a statement that the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency informed her that a sample she gave contained an elevated testosterone/epitestosterone level. Artificial testosterone can be used to enhance performance by growing muscle.

While she didn’t claim a spot in the 400 meters at the London Games, the 34-year-old Dunn was on the team as a potential member of the women’s 1,600-meter relay squad.

“While I work with Usada to resolve this matter, I am withdrawing from my relay pool position for the 2012 Olympic Games,” Dunn said. “I do not want any issue like this to distract from my teammates’ focus for the biggest meet of their lives. I wish Team USA best in London as I work toward resolving this matter.”

The testosterone/epitestosterone, or T/E, ratio is used to check whether the naturally occurring substances are within normal limits.

Usada is testing a second urine sample, Travis Tygart, chief executive officer of the Colorado Springs, Colorado-based organization, said in a statement.

“Usada appreciates Ms. Dunn voluntarily removing herself from the Olympic team while the full facts surrounding her elevated T/E ratio and adverse carbon isotope ratio analysis are evaluated,” Tygart said. “As in all cases all athletes are innocent until and unless proven otherwise.”

Dunn was the world indoor champion in the 400 meters in 2010, when she was also the U.S. outdoor champion. She would have been competing in her first Olympics.

To contact the reporter on this story: Mason Levinson in New York at mlevinson@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net.

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