Sub-Sahara Africa Stocks: Cement Co. of Northern Nigeria, Mumias

Kenya’s All-Share Index (NSEASI) fell 0.4 percent, a third day of declines, to 68.21 in Nairobi.

Mauritius’s SEMDEX Index (SEMDEX) slid for a fifth day, weakening 0.2 percent to 1,759.96 in Port Louis. The FTSE/Namibia Overall Index (FTN098) declined 1 percent to 894.74 in Windhoek. The Nigerian Stock Exchange All-Share Index fell 0.3 percent to 22,120.47 in Lagos, according to an e-mailed statement from the bourse.

The following shares rose or fell in sub-Saharan Africa, excluding South Africa. Stock symbols are in parentheses.

Barclays Bank Kenya Ltd. (BCBL) , the country’s second- biggest lender by market value, advanced 1.1 percent to 13.65 shillings, the highest since May 18, on speculation lower lending rates will boost demand for loans. Barclays will cut its base lending rate by 1.5 percentage points to 21 percent, effective Aug. 1, Chief Executive Officer Adan Mohamed said July 6.

Cement Co. of Northern Nigeria Plc (CCNN NL), a producer of the building material, fell the daily limit of 5 percent to 5.70 naira, the biggest loss since April 25, after reporting a 48 percent drop in first-quarter profit.

Mumias Sugar Co. (MSUG) , Kenya’s biggest producer of the sweetener, increased 2.2 percent to 6.85 shillings, the highest on a closing basis since Nov. 1, as the commodity rose for a third day in London and New York.

Total Kenya Ltd. (TKNL) , the local unit of Total SA (FP), dropped 2.2 percent to 15.45 shillings, the most since June 25. Oil fell after Norway ended a strike that threatened to halt output by western Europe’s largest crude exporter and as China reduced purchases of the raw material.

To contact the reporter on this story: Chris Kay in London at ckay5@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Gavin Serkin at gserkin@bloomberg.net

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