European Stocks Drop on Greek Impasse; Spanish Banks Fall

European stocks dropped for a second day, to the lowest level in almost four months, as investors awaited a resolution to the political impasse in Greece and as Spanish credit risk surged.

Bankia SA led a selloff in Spanish banks. Kloeckner & Co. and Mediaset SpA (MS) both plunged more than 8 percent after reporting first-quarter results. ING (INGA) Groep NV and Carlsberg A/S (CARLA) paced advancing shares.

The Stoxx Europe 600 Index lost 0.3 percent to 249.73 at the close of trading, the lowest since Jan. 13, as the euro weakened for an eighth day. The Stoxx 600 has tumbled 8.3 percent from this year’s high on March 16, trimming this year’s advance to 2.1 percent.

“The real concern isn’t about Greece, it’s about the euro and whether it breaks up -- that is key,” Mark Tinker, a fund manager at AXA Framlington Investment Management said on Bloomberg Television in London. “We don’t make a big economic scenario after a couple of days of moves, but I think there is a lot of anxious market repositioning going on right now.”

The benchmark Stoxx 600 yesterday dropped 1.7 percent after Antonis Samaras, the leader of Greece’s biggest political party, failed to reach an agreement on a new government and the mandate passed to left-wing leader Alexis Tsipras, who opposes austerity measures required for the nation’s financial rescue.

The euro fell to 1.2948 against the dollar at 4:25 p.m., for its longest losing streak in 3 1/2 years, as Tsipras meets with leaders of New Democracy and Pasok, the two Greek parties that supported austerity.

Political Stand-off

Tsipras yesterday squared off with political leaders before talks on forming a coalition, handing them an ultimatum to renounce support for the European Union-led rescue if they wanted to enter government.

The stand-off since the inconclusive May 6 election has reignited concerns over Greece’s ability to comply with the terms of its two bailouts negotiated since May 2010. The country is again facing the risk of an exit from the euro.

National benchmark indexes fell in 14 of the 18 western-European markets. France’s CAC 40 lost 0.2 percent and the U.K.’s FTSE 100 declined 0.4 percent, while Germany’s DAX added 0.5 percent. Spain’s IBEX 35 Index sank 2.8 percent, its lowest close since October, 2003.

The cost of insuring against a Spanish default surged to a record on concern a bailout of Bankia (BKIA) won’t fend of a banking crisis triggered by bad real-estate loans. Credit-default swaps insuring Spanish government debt rose 13 basis points to 512 basis points a 10:55 a.m. in London, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

‘Zombie Bank’

Bankia tumbled 5.8 percent to 2.13 euros, the lowest since it listed its shares in July 2011, as JPMorgan Chase & Co. downgraded the Spanish lender to underweight, the equivalent of a sell recommendation.

“While there is no danger of an imminent collapse at Bankia, there is a risk that it becomes a zombie bank, which has to rely on the European Central Bank to fund it over the long term,” said Roger Francis, an analyst at Mizuho International Plc in London.

Spanish 10-year government bonds extended a decline, pushing the yield on the securities above 6 percent for the first time since April 27. The yield climbed 20 basis points, or 0.17 percentage points, to 6.04 percent.

Banco Santander SA (SAN), Spain’s largest lender, dropped 4.5 percent to 4.64 euros and Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria SA (BBVA) retreated 4.7 percent to 5.01 euros.

Kloeckner, Mediaset

Kloeckner tumbled 8.2 percent to 8.33 euros after Europe’s largest independent steel trader reported a first-quarter loss of 10 million euros ($13 million), wider than the average analyst estimate for a 900,000 euro-loss. The company said its 2012 earnings will improve only if Europe’s economy recovers.

Mediaset lost 11 percent to 1.45 euros, the lowest since it sold shares to the public in July 1996. The broadcaster reported an 85 percent slump in first-quarter net income to 10.3 million euros after the close of trading yesterday on lower advertising sales. Analysts estimated net income of 6.5 million euros on sales of 984 million euros, according to a Bloomberg survey.

Mapfre SA (MAP) retreated 6.3 percent to 1.94 euros, the most since April 2010. The Spanish insurer reported a 13 percent drop in first-quarter net income to 271.4 million euros. That still beat the average analyst estimate of 250.3 million euros in a Bloomberg Survey.

ING, Carlsberg

ING paced advancing shares, climbing 1.7 percent to 5.08 euros. The biggest Dutch financial-services company reported earnings excluding one-time gains and losses of 705 million euros, surpassing the 632 million-euro estimate of analysts.

Net income sank 51 percent after a charge for a potential settlement of a U.S. probe offset a gain from the sale of its U.S. online bank.

Carlsberg jumped 3.8 percent to 490 kroner as the world’s fourth-biggest brewer confirmed its full-year outlook. The company reported a 43 percent drop in first-quarter operating profit, excluding some items, to 574 million kroner ($100 million) as it sold less beer in Russia. That missed the average analyst projection for 845 million kroner.

Lanxess AG (LXS) advanced 6.4 percent to 61.83 euros after the maker of synthetic rubber said growth in earnings may touch 10 percent this year, outstripping analysts’ estimates, as demand surges in emerging markets and the U.S. recovers.

For 2012, profit will probably grow 5 percent to 10 percent from last year’s 1.1 billion euros. Analysts estimated growth of about 6 percent.

ITV Plc (ITV) rose 2.2 percent to 82.50 pence. The U.K.’s biggest commercial broadcaster said it expects to outperform the TV advertising market in the first half and forecast ad revenue to increase by about 3 percent in the first half.

To contact the reporter on this story: Sarah Jones in London at sjones35@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Andrew Rummer at arummer@bloomberg.net

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