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Ex-Dodgers Owner Peter O’Malley Says He’s Considering Padres Bid

Peter O’Malley, whose family owned the Dodgers for 48 years and moved them from Brooklyn to Los Angeles, said he’s considering a bid for the San Diego Padres.

Padres owner John Moores said last week that he had hired investment bankers Allen & Co. and Moag & Co. to help sell the Major League Baseball team.

O’Malley, 74, was president of the Dodgers from 1970-98. His father, Walter O’Malley, ran the team from 1950-70 and moved the franchise to the West Coast in 1958.

“The interest is early, the ballclub has only been for sale for a few days,” O’Malley said yesterday in a phone interview. “I have not talked to John Moores. There is interest. We are considering it and it’s primarily the younger generation.”

O’Malley’s son, Kevin O’Malley, and a nephew, Tom Seidler, lead Top of the Third, Inc., a family partnership that has owned the minor-league Visalia Rawhide for the past 11 years.

Seidler is president and general manager of the club, which is located in central California and is a farm team of the Arizona Diamondbacks.

The O’Malley family’s interest in bidding for the Padres was first reported by the Los Angeles Times.

O’Malley sold the Dodgers in 1998 to News Corp. (NWSA), which sold the team six years later to Frank McCourt. Last month, McCourt accepted a $2.3 billion bid to sell the team out of bankruptcy to a group led by National Basketball Association Hall of Famer Magic Johnson and Guggenheim Partners Chief Executive Mark Walter.

The O’Malley family expressed interest in buying back the Dodgers when McCourt put the team up for sale last year. O’Malley put together a group that included South Korean apparel retailer E-Land to bid on the Dodgers, then withdrew the bid in February.

To contact the reporter on this story: Rob Gloster in San Francisco at rgloster@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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