Ryanair Loses EU Court Challenge Over Alitalia Rescue Loan

Ryanair Holdings Plc (RYA) lost a court challenge that may have forced Alitalia SpA (AZA)’s owners to repay a 300 million-euro ($401 million) loan from the Italian government.

The European Union general court dismissed Ryanair’s case and confirmed the European Commission’s approval of the sale of Alitalia’s main assets to Compagnia Aerea Italiana, a group of Italian investors, after the airline’s 2008 bankruptcy, according to a statement from the Luxembourg-based tribunal.

CAI, including Intesa Sanpaolo SpA (ISP) and Atlantia SpA (ATL), wasn’t required to repay the state loan that the EU said was illegal aid, the court confirmed. Air France-KLM Group (AF), Europe’s biggest airline, bought 25 percent of Alitalia from CAI in 2009.

“The sale did not have the effect of circumventing the obligation to recover the aid or of granting aid to the buyers of Alitalia,” the court ruled.

Ryanair, based in Dublin, declined to immediately comment. The ruling can be appealed to the region’s highest court.

Alitalia said in a statement that it isn’t liable for any of the aid because it isn’t seen as a legal successor to the airline that sought bankruptcy protection. It also said it paid the market price for the carrier’s assets.

EU regulators previously said that new investors aren’t responsible for paying back illegal state aid as long as they purchase the assets at market price.

Ryanair partly won a court challenge last year over the commission’s handling of complaints by the company against alleged unlawful state aid by Italy to a number of competitors including Alitalia. Ryanair has also sued regulators for failing to investigate government aid to Alitalia.

The case is T-123/09 Ryanair v. Commission.

To contact the reporter on this story: Aoife White in Brussels at awhite62@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Anthony Aarons at aaarons@bloomberg.net.

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.