Isner Breaks Into Top Ten, Djokovic Keeps No. 1 Spot in Tennis

John Isner of the U.S. broke into the top ten of the men’s tennis tour for the first time in his career after he reached the BNP Paribas Open finals in Indian Wells, California.

Isner, who lost his first Masters finals to Roger Federer of Switzerland in straight sets yesterday, moved up one spot to No. 10 on the rankings of the ATP World Tour released today. Isner, 26, had reached the title match by beating Wimbledon, U.S. Open and Australian champion Novak Djokovic of Serbia in the semi-finals.

The top eight of the ATP World Tour remained the same, with Djokovic at No. 1, followed by Rafael Nadal of Spain, Federer at No. 3 and Britain’s Andy Murray occupying the fourth spot.

Juan Martin Del Potro, the 2009 U.S. Open champion from Argentina, dropped two places to No. 11. Mardy Fish of the U.S. stayed at No. 8.

Isner achieved global fame in 2010, when he played the longest match in tennis history. He beat France’s Nicolas Mahut in the first round of Wimbledon in a match that lasted 11 hours, 5 minutes and took three days to complete. The 6-foot-9 American is one of the strongest servers on the tour, producing an average of 15.1 aces per match. Djokovic averages 6.3 aces per match, Nadal 3.7 and Federer 7.6, according to statistics on the ATP website.

Victoria Azarenka remained at No. 1 on the women’s WTA Tour. The Belarussian yesterday posted her 23rd victory this season with a straight sets win over second-ranked Maria Sharapova of Russia. Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic is at No. 3. Former world No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki dropped two spots to No. 6, after the Dane lost in the fourth round in Indian Wells.

To contact the reporter on this story: Danielle Rossingh on the London sports desk at drossingh@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Christopher Elser at celser@bloomberg.net.

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