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High Temperatures to Reach Eastern U.S. Next Week, Forecasts Say

Temperatures in many parts of the U.S. Northeast and Midwest may be 20 degrees Fahrenheit (11 Celsius) above normal next week, forecasters said.

New York, Chicago, Washington and Boston are expected to reach 80 or above next week, according to MDA EarthSat Weather in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

“Widespread anomalies exceeding 20 degrees above normal will be common across the Midwest and Northeast, with some areas likely to be as much as 30 degrees warmer than average,” according to MDA’s forecast. “The most extreme warmth will be found early in the central U.S.”

Traders watch temperature predictions to gauge energy use and demand. Warm weather will drive up electricity use as people turn on air conditioners. About 51 percent of U.S. households use natural gas for heating, according to the Energy Department.

How long the hotter weather continues isn’t clear, said Matt Rogers, president of Commodity Weather Group LLC in Bethesda, Maryland.

While temperatures in the East may be 8 degrees higher than normal, computer models show some cooling is possible in the March 24 to March 28 time frame, Rogers said in his 11- to 15- day outlook.

“Given the strength of the current situation, we again chose to take a cautious approach to bringing temperatures lower,” Rogers said in a note to clients.

The normal average temperature in New York on March 21 is about 44 degrees, according to MDA. It’s 40 in Boston and Chicago, 48 in St. Louis, 56 in Atlanta, 59 in Dallas, 64 in Houston, 48 in Seattle, and 59 in Burbank, California.

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at bsullivan10@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dan Stets at dstets@bloomberg.net

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