Former News of the World Editor Colin Myler to Join New York Daily News

Colin Myler, former editor of the Rupert Murdoch-owned News of the World tabloid shuttered amid a hacking scandal in July, was appointed editor-in-chief of The New York Daily News, according to an internal memo.

Myler, 59, will succeed Kevin Convey Jan. 10, the newspaper said. Convey had been editor of the New York tabloid since August 2010.

“The New York Daily News is a great institution of American journalism which will only get better under the leadership of Colin,” Chairman and Publisher Mort Zuckerman said in the memo.

Myler was editor of the 168-year-old London-based News of the World newspaper before parent company News Corp. closed it in July after revelations it hacked into the phones of a murdered schoolgirl, celebrities and politicians.

The editor remains at the center of a dispute with his former boss, News Corp. (NWSA) Deputy Chief Operating Officer James Murdoch, who said Myler and the newspaper’s lawyer, Tom Crone, failed to inform him how widespread hacking was at the newspaper.

Myler contradicted that statement when testifying before U.K. Parliament in September, saying he had fully informed Murdoch of the brewing scandal prior to reports in the Guardian newspaper.

Myler, who previously was managing and executive editor of Daily News competitor New York Post from 2001 to 2007, takes over as newspapers suffer big declines in advertising revenue.

“Colin Myler will lead our print and digital platforms into the next generation of newspaper publishing,” Bill Holiber, chief executive of the Daily News, said in the message to staff.

“I am immensely proud and honored to be leading one of America’s great newspapers into a new era,” Myler said in the memo to Daily News staffers.

To contact the reporter on this story: Edmund Lee in New York at elee310@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Ville Heiskanen in New York at vheiskanen@bloomberg.net

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